The Andromeda Evolution: Crichton’s Andromeda Strain Sequel

The Andromeda Evolution: Crichton’s Andromeda Strain Sequel

The Andromeda Evolution: Crichton’s Andromeda Strain sequel, terrifying sequel, has arrived as Daniel H. Wilson finished the late author’s manuscript with the support of the Michael Crichton’s family.

And this begs the question: just how many more Michael Crichton unfinished manuscripts are waiting to be finished in future collaborations?

Wilson, a robotics engineer, is best known for his use of literary wit and technology and is most famous for his ridiculous thriller “Robopcalypse,” so he was an apt choice for collaborating on the late author Chrighton’s sequel to his pandemic-driven novel.

The following review will contain **SPOILERS** for both The Andromeda Strain and The Andromeda Evolution.

The Andromeda Strain, as millions of fans know, describes the panicked efforts to stop the spread of an alien microparticle that first instantly coagulates human blood or induces the harrowing suicide of dozens to only then mutate to dissolve plastics in the upper atmosphere.

Here is the story synopsis, and the review continues below it.


From Goodreads.com:

Hardcover, 384 pages
Published November 12th 2019 by Harper

In 1967, an extraterrestrial microbe came crashing down to Earth and nearly ended the human race. Accidental exposure to the particle—designated The Andromeda Strain—killed every resident of the town of Piedmont, Arizona, save for an elderly man and an infant boy. Over the next five days, a team of top scientists assigned to Project Wildfire worked valiantly to save the world from an epidemic of unimaginable proportions. In the moments before a catastrophic nuclear detonation, they succeeded.

In the ensuing decades, research on the microparticle continued. And the world thought it was safe…

Deep inside Fairchild Air Force Base, Project Eternal Vigilance has continued to watch and wait for the Andromeda Strain to reappear. On the verge of being shut down, the project has registered no activity—until now. A Brazilian terrain-mapping drone has detected a bizarre anomaly of otherworldly matter in the middle of the jungle, and, worse yet, the tell-tale chemical signature of the deadly microparticle.

Project Wildfire is activated, and a diverse team of experts hailing from all over the world is dispatched to investigate the potentially apocalyptic threat. If the Wildfire team can’t reach the quarantine zone, enter the anomaly, and figure out how to stop it, this new Andromeda Evolution will annihilate all life as we know it.


Fifty years later, a mutated strain has dropped in Earth’s atmosphere while a special team of observers maintain Project Eternal Vigilance.

When The Andromeda Evolution opens, a drone spots a metallic-looking shape growing up out of the Amazon jungle, “the whole of it gleaming like a beetle’s waxy shell in the rising midday sun.”

Situated along the equator, this giant structure is located far from any development, deep in an area inhabited only by tribes who have never made contact with modern civilization.

Mass spectrometry data taken by military satellites indicates that the quickly swelling mutation is “an almost exact match to the Andromeda strain.”

A nuclear strike is debated but considered too problematic to be enacted as a “solution.”

A nuclear explosion would feed the anomaly that lives off energy…provoking the declaration:

“We are facing an unknown enemy who is staging an attack over the gulf of a hundred-thousand years and across our solar system and likely the cosmos.

“This is war.”

Humanity’s hope falls on Project Wildfire’s shoulders.

Consisting of a few scientists, the elite Wildfire team tries to keep the planet from being infected while persisting through the perilous jungle landscape that they find they are dangerously ill-equipped to face.

The jungle proves to be an ominous setting with death and misery lurking around every suspenseful corner. Wilson’s background in robotics is illustrated throughout the novel as technological gizmos play a crucial role in the plot.

Crichton would be proud of the culminated novel. His typical style of literary pacing is amplified in this suspenseful rollercoaster – an exponential increase of suspense carries through until the novel’s conclusion.

Near future technology and innovation are present and most appreciating to read.

The Andromeda Evolution is a must-read sequel for The Andromeda Strain fans and the science fiction community.

The Forgotten Fiction Grade: YEA (read it!)


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The Andromeda Strain, Daniel H. Wilson, Michael Crichton, The Andromeda Evolution, book review, book, fiction, sci-fi, science fiction, robotics

“IThe Andromeda Evolution: Crichton’s Andromeda Strain Sequel” was written by Peter Maisano.

Book Review: MICRO By Michael Crichton & Richard Preston WOWs

Book Review: MICRO By Michael Crichton & Richard Preston WOWs

Book Review: Micro By Michael Crichton & Richard Preston WOWs, as young upcoming grad students find themselves heading to Hawaii in pursuit of cutting-edge careers in microbiology a whole new world is opened up to them on the wake of a murder investigation.

The Crichton manuscript and notes for Micro were posthumously delivered to Preston who continued the stunning, thrilling, science-based adventure story Crichton is so well known for.

Preston deserves exceptional credit for delivering the novel with Crichton’s pacing and tone – a work that he would truly be proud of.

Micro, Michael Crichton, Richard Preston, book review

Here is the story synopsis, and the review continues below it.


From michaelcrichton.com:

Hardcover
Published in 2011 by HarperCollins

Paperback
Published in 2012 by HarperCollins

First Edition Release Date: March, 2019

In a locked Honolulu office building, three men are found dead with no sign of struggle except for the ultrafine, razor-sharp cuts covering their bodies. The only clue left behind is a tiny bladed robot, nearly invisible to the human eye.

In the lush forests of Oahu, groundbreaking technology has ushered in a revolutionary era of biological prospecting. Trillions of microorganisms, tens of thousands of bacteria species, are being discovered; they are feeding a search for priceless drugs and applications on a scale beyond anything previously imagined.

In Cambridge, Massachusetts, seven graduate students at the forefront of their fields are recruited by a pioneering microbiology start-up. Nanigen MicroTechnologies dispatches the group to a mysterious lab in Hawaii, where they are promised access to tools that will open a whole new scientific frontier.

But once in the Oahu rain forest, the scientists are thrust into a hostile wilderness that reveals profound and surprising dangers at every turn. Armed only with their knowledge of the natural world, they find themselves prey to a technology of radical and unbridled power. To survive, they must harness the inherent forces of nature itself.


This is a *SPOILER-FUL Review WARNING*

Micro starts with a murder mystery and captivates the reader with gripping action scenes that only get more compelling until the novel ends.

As a Hawaiian tech company’s malicious owner – a crook and a killer – uses his new technology to shrink a group of grad students down to half an inch, they find themselves stranded in the rainforest, in an unknown environment, running from giant insects and other gruesome creatures.

Micro, Michael Crichton, Richard Preston, book review

Michael Crichton doing research for Micro in Hawaii | Photo credit: Sherri Crichton

Charles Darwin’s Survival of the Fittest is law and it takes all of their intellect to survive.

Crichton and Preston take us to a whole new world – delightful imagery, chilling predators, and a new ecosystem.

They show their love for the natural world, but remind the readers of its explicit cruelty. The authors adopt a shocking realism. Characters are picked off right and left, sometimes without warning, and in the cruelest of ways.

An argument can be made for one dimensional characters; but heroic rescues always make up for character flaws.

Micro, Michael Crichton, Richard Preston, book review

A page of Michael Crichton’s handwritten Micro notes

Crichton died in 2008 at the age of 66. He was writing thrillers in medical school under the pen name John Lange.

His novels often blend medical and technological elements with adventure and violence. Upon his death, he left this unfinished manuscript, including detailed plot outlines and notes, with Richard Preston, himself a respected author of science-related novels such as The Hot Zone.

All in all, Micro ensures all readers will reflect upon the beauty and horror of the natural world. Especially if/when a villain has the technology to create micro-drones that could kill any leader on Earth.

 

The Forgotten Fiction Grade: YEA (read it!)

 

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“Book Review: MICRO By Michael Crichton & Richard Preston WOWs” was written by Peter Maisano for The Forgotten Fiction.