Book Review: Timeline By Michael Crichton 5/5 Stars

Book Review: Timeline By Michael Crichton 5/5 Stars

Book Review: Timeline By Michael Crichton 5/5 Stars; leave it to Crichton to revitalize the past with such a vigorous and entertaining novel and a possible prescience for the infinite possibilities of science.

Timeline carries the reader into a realm of unexpected suspense and danger, often altering our most fundamental ideas of what is truly possible.

This magnificent adventure combines a science of the future – the emerging field of quantum technology – with the complex realities of the medieval past.

Timeline Will Now Be Discussed With Mild SPOILERS (the ending is not discussed)**

Michael Crichton’s Timeline opens on the threshold of the twenty-first century. It is a world – our present, mind you – exploding in advances of technology.

A daring tech company has succeeded in creating a quantum computer. With the near-instantaneous computing commutation and revolutionary massive data banks, the company has managed the long-awaited sci-fi dream of “copying” an entire person.

Not only that, but they also managed to manipulate and enlarge quantum foam particles. Combing these two remarkable feats they are able to send a person through a wormhole in space between two quantum foam particles – much like a fax machine.

The quantum world is an interesting place, one that scientists still don’t fully understand today. It can behave very differently than the physical world we know. Crichton explores this new frontier and includes many interesting footnotes for curious readers to follow up with.

Crichton dared to imagine a possibility of quantum foam wormholes connecting to a plethora of universes where different time periods all exist simultaneously.

This remarkable adventure is not technically time travel, but rather the ability to travel to a nearly identical past.

ITC’s CEO Robert Doniger, inventor of this quantum technology, believes people of the twentieth century will grow bored of current entertainment and crave anything that isn’t controlled by corporations. He argues people will turn to the past for rare and desirable experiences of authenticity.

Therefore, the future is in the past. And he plans to sell these authentic trips to the past, like tycoon John Hammond’s Jurassic Park or Walt Disney’s Disneyland.

ITC has been steadily buying up property around the world and funding archeological digs to learn more about possible “time travel” locations.

We meet our university protagonists at a dig in France. When pressed about funding, ITC allows Professor Edward Johnson to explore his exact dig in fourteenth century France using their quantum technology.

When the professor doesn’t return, only a group of his graduate students are his best chance of survival. This group has been given the chance of a lifetime: not just to study the past, but to enter it. However, they may find themselves fighting for their own survival – six hundred years ago during the Hundred Years War.

Crichton remains a master of narrative drive and cleverness; there’s never a dull moment.

Excitement runs high during the rescue attempt and higher still as Crichton invests his story with terrific period detail: castles, sword-play, jousts, sudden death and bold knights-in-shining-armor.

There is also strong suspense as Crichton cuts between past and present, where the time-travel machine has broken: Will the heroes survive and make it back?

Best of all, the medieval setting is highly accurate and described well.

This alone makes the book a worthwhile read, especially for those who are unfamiliar or only somewhat familiar with the Middle Ages.

Crichton effectively addresses some common misconceptions about medieval life. He presents the reader with a vivid picture that is at times much more attractive, and at other times much more frightening and repellent, than that is generally presented to us in popular fiction and film.

Crichton truly managed to bring the Middle Ages to life.

Timeline was made into a feature-length, theatrical-release movie, directed by Richard Donner and starring Paul Walker, Frances O’Connor, Gerard Butler, Billy Connolly and David Thewlis.

But if you want to see it, you will have to look back into your past to do it.

The Forgotten Fiction Grade: YEA (read it!)


Want To Buy The Book from a local bookseller? Click Away!

timeline, Book Review, Michael Crichton, adventure, quantum, book reviews

“Book Review: Timeline By Michael Crichton 5/5 Stars” was written by Peter Maisano.


Synopsis from Goodreads:

In an Arizona desert, a man wanders in a daze, speaking words that make no sense. Within twenty-four hours he is dead, his body swiftly cremated by his only known associates. Halfway around the world, archaeologists make a shocking discovery at a medieval site. Suddenly they are swept off to the headquarters of a secretive multinational corporation that has developed an astounding technology. Now this group is about to get a chance not to study the past but to enter it. And with history opened up to the present, the dead awakened to the living, these men and women will soon find themselves fighting for their very survival — six hundred years ago.

Mass Market Paperback, 489 pages
Published June 2000 by Arrow Books (first published November 16th 1999)

 

 

For Readers Who Struggled: The Catcher in the Rye Book Review

For Readers Who Struggled: The Catcher in the Rye Book Review

For Readers Who Struggled: The Catcher in the Rye Book Review of J.D. Salinger’s classic.

This review is aimed for readers who struggled to understand this novel.

I hope you can see my perspective and that maybe you will give this novel another try so that you can appreciate the genius and insight this book has to offer. You don’t have to love it, but I hope you will grow to respect it.

Many of us have read this classic during high school: WARNING! there will be sufficient SPOILERS.

J.D. Salinger’s classic novel of teenage angst and rebellion was first published in 1951. It has been frequently challenged in court for its liberal use of profanity and portrayal of sexuality.

This book rises above controversy and debate, and that is part of what makes it such an interesting read.

The Catcher in the Rye certainly isn’t for everyone, but I find it a compelling and exciting read.

It has a hearty dose of realism mixed with some humor that is contrasted with moments of depression and emotional pain.

Despite being written in 1951, many teenagers today are still able to relate to the various themes presented throughout the novel. Teenagers can often relate because of the complex themes of rebellion, identity, and independence.

This modern classic falls into a coming-of age-genre and a good one at that.

Personally, I find the main character absolutely intriguing. I find it fascinating to get inside the head of the strange, rebellious Holden Caulfield.

The book begins with Holden directly addressing you, the reader.  He begins to retell the events over a three-day period from the previous December.

His story starts at Pencey Prep, a prestigious boarding school filled with, what Holden calls, “phonies.” Although Holden tries to “play it off cool,” the reader can tell, early on, that he his quite lazy and completely clueless about his direction in life.

Holden is on a destructive path carrying his guilt, pain and loss, as it leads him in no direction.

Throughout his escapade in New York, he seeks meaning, help, and guidance, yet avoids these needs with indulgences and distractions – just trying to feel something other than pain.

He seeks out his teacher’s console because he needs to talk to someone who isn’t a phonie – he wants someone that will truly listen and provide guidance.  He is in pain and feels hopelessly lost – even if he doesn’t admit this to himself.

There is no scheduled outline designed by the writer. Nothing advancing the plot: no rising action, conflict, or resolution – in the traditional sense. This is a broken teenager’s story of the chaotic last couple of days before he was admitted into the hospital.

The story erupts when all of his repressed emotions finally burst to the surface and crash his whole world down. All his acts of rebellion only are masking the pain of his grief.

The entire book is essentially one long flashback.

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He is retelling the events he experienced prior to being admitted to a psychiatric hospital. After reading the last page of this story, think back on what you have read with this new perspective you have just gained.

Imagine you are a patient in the hospital with Holden. This story is the conversation you two are having. He is telling you why he is here – what led up to this point of you sitting next to him.

And just as his personal story is getting more and more difficult to tell, he stops abruptly, shifts the blame to you “not wanting to bore you with his story” in order to defend himself from sharing any more of his personal sorrow.

To me, Salinger’s speech is so important. When you’re depressed and can’t get out of your own way, you can’t think; you get stuck on thoughts.

This is why Holden is constantly repeating and often contradicting himself. He can’t make sense of anything.

He is so guilt stricken from the death of his brother. It is always on his mind. He constantly comes back to it because he hasn’t gotten over it.  It bothers him that the world has moved on – that his family has moved on.

He’s stuck in a loop of survivor’s guilt. His life stopped when his brother died and he isn’t willing to move on. Holden has been lost for some time.

What I think readers miss most about this story is that, although Holden is the protagonist of this story, he is not a character you should idolize. In fact, the opposite is true.

Holden’s character is meant to personify the “lost soul.”

We may all be able to identify with a piece of him and if you do you should recognize that you, like Holden, need help – hopefully before you lose your way completely and fall down the rabbit hole.

He personifies the struggle most teens face when they begin to enter the adult world. You need to be able to sort out the “phonies,” call the bullshit, start to tackle your own inner demons, seek help, and find your own way.

To each their own; we all have our own demons.

Maybe it’s my psychology background that makes me want to psychoanalyze Holden, so keep in mind this is my perspective – what I see in Holden. At the very least I hope you can try to see that point of view.

One of the greatest insights this novel has to offer is in the mind of Holden Caulfield – the mind of our mentally wounded.

The Forgotten Fiction Grade: YEA (read it!)


Want To Buy The Book from a local bookseller? Click Away!

 

 

“For Readers Who Struggled: The Catcher in the Rye Book Review” was written by Peter Maisano.


Synopsis from Goodreads:

The hero-narrator of The Catcher in the Rye is an ancient child of sixteen, a native New Yorker named Holden Caulfield. Through circumstances that tend to preclude adult, secondhand description, he leaves his prep school in Pennsylvania and goes underground in New York City for three days. The boy himself is at once too simple and too complex for us to make any final comment about him or his story. Perhaps the safest thing we can say about Holden is that he was born in the world not just strongly attracted to beauty but, almost, hopelessly impaled on it. There are many voices in this novel: children’s voices, adult voices, underground voices-but Holden’s voice is the most eloquent of all. Transcending his own vernacular, yet remaining marvelously faithful to it, he issues a perfectly articulated cry of mixed pain and pleasure. However, like most lovers and clowns and poets of the higher orders, he keeps most of the pain to, and for, himself. The pleasure he gives away, or sets aside, with all his heart. It is there for the reader who can handle it to keep.

J.D. Salinger’s classic novel of teenage angst and rebellion was first published in 1951. The novel was included on Time’s 2005 list of the 100 best English-language novels written since 1923. It was named by Modern Library and its readers as one of the 100 best English-language novels of the 20th century. It has been frequently challenged in the court for its liberal use of profanity and portrayal of sexuality and in the 1950’s and 60’s it was the novel that every teenage boy wants to read.

Paperback, First Back Bay Paperback Edition (US/CAN), 277 pages
Published January 30th 2001 by Back Bay Books (first published July 16th 1951)\
Original Title:
The Catcher in the Rye
ISBN
0316769177 (ISBN13: 9780316769174)
New York City, New York, 1949 (United States)
Agerstown, Pennsylvania, 1949 (United States)
The Forgotten Fiction ANNOUNCEMENT SCHEDULE 3-2021 To 8-2021

The Forgotten Fiction ANNOUNCEMENT SCHEDULE 3-2021 To 8-2021

The Forgotten Fiction ANNOUNCEMENT SCHEDULE 3-2021 To 6-2021: we are going keep TFF’s Eager Readers up to snuff with all of the happenings, from book reviews, to guest reviewers, to giveaway contests, to Rune Works reader-inspired creations.

BIG THINGS Coming To TFF!

Seeing how TFF has grown immensely in just a few short months and less than a year since its launch, I want to thank you all for your support and shared enthusiasm for all that we love as bibliophiles.


ANNOUNCEMENT SCHEDULE 3-2021 To 8-2021

 

  • March 30, 2021 @ 12pm EST

    • TFF Book Giveaway Contest Is Announced & Opened To Enter Free

  • April 5, 2021 @ 1pm EST

    • TFF Livestream & Giveaway Contest Drawing

  • April 28, 2021 @ 1pm EST

    • TFF Book Giveaway Contest Is Announced & Opened To Enter Free

  • May 4, 2021 @ 1pm EST

    • TFF Livestream & Giveaway Contest Drawing

  • May 26, 2021 @ 1pm EST

    • TFF Book Giveaway Contest Is Announced & Opened To Enter Free

  • June 1, 2021 @ 1pm EST

    • TFF Livestream & Giveaway Contest Drawing

  • June 30, 2021 @ 1pm EST

    • TFF Book Giveaway Contest Is Announced & Opened To Enter Free

  • July 6, 2021 @ 1pm EST

    • TFF Livestream & Giveaway Contest Drawing

  • July 28, 2021 @ 1pm EST

    • TFF Book Giveaway Contest Is Announced & Opened To Enter Free

  • August 3, 2021 @ 1pm EST

    • TFF Livestream & Giveaway Contest Drawing

  • August 25, 2021 @ 1pm EST

    • TFF Book Giveaway Contest Is Announced & Opened To Enter Free


And so we will be doing a monthly livestream, via Facebook Live, and in that brief time I will share news for upcoming book reviews and RW Cases or other creations, as well as finish each session with a drawing to choose a winner for a free giveaway contest.

What did I just say?!

Well, yeah, every month there will be a free to enter TFF Giveaway Contest taking place the week before the livestream.

I love reading, and TFF will be spreading the love!

stephen king signature, traycase, Custom Book Case, custom slipcase, hand-made, Dolso, the stand, stephen king, bernie wrightson, trashcan man

The prizes will get better and better – wait until you see this month’s contest! – and most often there will be a choice for the winner (or winners, when we mix it up) to choose from so that if we are giving away books you can hopefully get something you do not have.

Quite a few brilliant authors are interested in writing book reviews on all sorts of fiction.

I spoke briefly last week on Elizabeth Yoo’s upcoming reviews of 1960’s Italian fiction that she will blow us away with, but so much more than that is on the horizon, and since I love almost every type of fiction out there, from horror and sci-fi to historical fiction, there will always be a fun variety to peruse.

So in this site’s NEWS section I will post a TFF Quarterly ANNOUNCEMENT SCHEDULE and I will feature them in a pulldown from the site menu under NEWS too.

What is coming up?

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Well, besides the monthly contests, I will pick a book of the month that either was or is going to be reviewed during the livestream – a teaser, if you will – and I would like to start some Q/A time too (maybe not every time), but I will play that by ear. I love to live in the moment, so we will see where things take us.

Coming up next in book reviews…

In no particular order, except that CD’s NIGHT SHIFT by Stephen King is almost certainly next, here are the book-newcomers to The Forgotten Fiction magazine:

  • NIGHT SHIFT by Stephen King – Cemetery Dance Gift Edition
  • Ready Player One By Ernest Cline – Lettered Edition By Curious King Books
  • Seed By Ania Ahlborn – Numbered Edition By Suntup Editions
  • Crackle and Fire: An Angela Hardwicke Mystery By Russ Colchamiro – By Crazy 8 Press
  • Alice By Lewis Carroll – Numbered Edition by Amaranthine Books
  • Later By Stephen King – Numbered Edition By Hard Case Crime
  • A Scanner Darkly By Philip K. Dick – Suntup Editions Numbered and Artist Editions
  • Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury – Suntup Editions Numbered and Artist Editions
  • More Books by Michael Crichton – requests are open, folks!
  • The End Of Eternity By Isaac Asimov (and pictures of a rare first edition)
  • The Time Machine, The Invisible Man, and The War Of The Worlds, all By H.G. Wells – all Suntup Edition’s Limited Numbered
  • Killer Come Back To Me the unpublished Ray Bradbury book celebrating Bradbury’s 100th birthday by Hard Case Crime

There will be many books that pop up and wedge there way in between the ones above, but these are some of the fiction titles, young and old, to look forward to.

Branching off of both The Forgotten Fiction and my fledgling production company, press and PR agency Rune Works Productions Ltd. are the literary creations crafted by hand in my woodshop, like the TFF Rune Works Book Cases.

Call them traycases, slipcases, or whatever else you want, but do not call them mass produced haha.

These are beloved creations that I have hand crafted for my own library, art to hold my most precious art.

I am busy working on these RW Rare Book Cases:

  • A one-of-a-kind SILENCE OF THE LAMBS 2021 ARC case for the winner of the Unofficial Fans Of Suntup group’s contest, Kyle – this will be a 1 / 1 and like nothing anyone has ever seen
  • THE STAND Case With Licensed Bernie Wrightson Art – for UK and for US 1st printings
  • SECRET Case Project [hint: horror and Ania Ahlborn]
  • CARRIE 1st Edition case
  • FAHRENHEIT 451 case
  • The Gunslinger case
  • The Long Walk case
  • “The Bachman Books” case
  • “Gunslinger” Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction cases
  • A I of I creation customized for an issue of Astounding Fiction from 1953
  • Startling Mystery 1967 and 1969 Case
  • Fight Club cases, with a strip of cartoon film?
  • A Scanner Darkly case for the first edition of Philip K. Dick’s classic
  • Revival Us First Edition for signed copies
  • End Of Watch Us First Edition for signed copies
  • If It Bleeds Us First Edition for signed copies
  • The End Of Eternity Isaac Asimov case
  • And even a non-book case for a rare Star Wars Lego piece!

There are a couple of cases I want to remain a secret for now.

stephen king signature, traycase, Custom Book Case, custom slipcase, hand-made, Dolso, the stand, stephen king, bernie wrightson, trashcan man

These are some ambitious projects that I have undertaken and some will be ready to fly in the near future, while others may take a year or more to develop (some have already crossed into this realm).

These are handmade and planned and collaborated on with usually one person, me, or a very few others, at times.

That takes time.

But I love to make them and I love to see their purpose fulfilled as the books join with them, and much as time is one of our most precious commodities, up there with family and health, I take my time to ensure the quality I feel all of my work, from my written works to my web-made to my hand-made works all are the most they can be.

Be kind to one another, be safe, and go read!

 

Best,

 

~R.J.H.

Welcome to the TFF & RW Book Case NEWS Section

Welcome to the TFF & RW Book Case NEWS Section

Welcome to the TFF & RW Book Case NEWS Section!

As The Forgotten Fiction magazine grows, so do the reviews of books 60+ days old and small press editions. And right along with that review of the literary and bibliophile art are the increasing Rune Works Book Case projects: art to encompass and protect art.

I thought it only fair to begin a dialogue here, that will also be shared on our social media networks, and will hopefully engage you, the new fans of TFF, to express your thoughts and ideas as well.

There are a lot of books in the works to be reviewed!

There are plans in the works for many more classics, contemporary titles, and small and fine press editions to be examined on TFF in-depth.

I will list some of the likely prospects that are already on the radar below.

And as the literary arts spread, so to has the handmade wooden RW Book Cases and the plans and new projects in the fire are already growing vast for the forging.

I want to personally ask all of you who are tuning in to reach out in any way you like to express your thoughts on what is being done at TFF and what you would like to see done.

I implore you all, eager readers, to make your voices heard! It is infinitely more fun that way.

Since this is the inaugural TFF & RW Book Case NEWS post, I wanted to introduce myself very briefly.

My name is R.J. Huneke, I founded The Forgotten Fiction, and I have been a published author for decades now. My first job ass a reviewer case as a columnist for the New York tabloid Newsday where I did reviews of pop culture and of local bars; I also was a reviewer of books for The Examiner, ScfiNow, Fantasy Matters, and continue to write on and review robotics and gadgetry for Gadizmo. Most of my work has come in the form of short fiction, poetry, and non-fiction articles, though I have been a passionate novelist since I was 19 years old, and my first novel picked up by a publisher, Cyberwar, was released in 2015.

I have a bevy of contributors lining up to write reviews for TFF, and both myself and Peter Maisano will continue to regularly write as well.

Artists including Paul Michael Kane – photography (and whose 19th Edition works of art I often include in cases sent out) – and Jeff Terry – book unboxing extraordinaire – are active on TFF.

All contributors on TFF are talented and unique artists with their own channels for their works, and I encourage you to take a look at their fantastic works – you will not be disappointed.

Now to the fun stuff!

I may be all business – and grammatically anal in my reviews – but I aim to let my humor come out for a much more fun tone in my NEWS posts.

And so . . . to the BOOKS!

The joy of making this platform was that it is open to any book of fiction out 60 days or more. ANY!

The possibilities are endless.

I want the author – who typically gets little to no marketing after 60 days – to benefit, I want the reader who may have missed a classic or two to benefit, and I want the publishers to benefit, since they, too, are hurting in the US.

And to add on to that, I especially want the small press publishers to not just survive but to thrive!

You have kept and engaged so many readers over the years, and you have kept paper books relevant and special works of art for the storied art contained therein and it means the world to us readers.

So you know: first and foremost I am a reader.

I am a Constant Reader, loud and proud.

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And The Forgotten Fiction magazine will be hitting on:

  • Stardust By Neil Gaiman – Lyra’s Books Numbered Edition
  • Bram Stoker’s Dracula – Numbered Edition by Amaranthine Books
  • Later By Stephen King – Numbered Edition By Hard Case Crime
  • A Scanner Darkly By Philip K. Dick – Suntup Editions Numbered and Artist Editions
  • Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury – Suntup Editions Numbered and Artist Editions
  • More Books by Michael Crichton – requests are open, folks!
  • The End Of Eternity By Isaac Asimov (and pictures of a rare first edition)
  • The Time Machine By H.G. Wells – Suntup Edition’s Numbered
  • Killer Come Back To Me the unpublished Ray Bradbury book celebrating Bradbury’s 100th birthday by Hard Case Crime

And so many more books will be reviewed and mixed in with the above, all which will come out in no particular order.

Embrace the chaos of reading!

If that was not exciting enough for me, I love talking and writing about books, there has been a bevy of new woodworking projects I have undertaken.

Most are Rune Works Rare Book Cases, and some are offshoots.

One such offshoot is a one-time wooden and engraved sign for Stephen King’s The Stand to accompany the book case being built and many of the Eager Readers of The Forgotten Fiction will have an opportunity to get one, since it is not a case, I will make more than the 19 limited that I keep to for cases (I am thinking 100 right now).

It will be awesome! Sneak-peak coming today or tomorrow right before the new mini-series airs!

Back to the cases. I am currently working on the following:

  • The Gunslinger cases
  • The Lord Of The Rings ACE First Edition case
  • “Gunslinger” Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction cases
  • A I of I creation customized for an issue of Astounding Fiction from 1953
  • Startling Mystery 1967 and 1969 Case
  • The Stand case – one for UK and one for US 1st printings
  • Fight Club case
  • Revival Us First Edition for signed copies
  • End Of Watch Us First Edition for signed copies
  • If It Bleeds Us First Edition for signed copies
  • The End Of Eternity case
  • “The Four Bachman Books” cases
  • And even a non-book case for a rare Star Wars Lego piece!

As you can see things are heating up at the forge, and I thank you all for your time, your enthusiasm, your love of great works of fiction, and your pushing me to show this art to the world.

Stay tuned to the TFF & RW Book Case NEWS section here.

If you have any ideas, thoughts, or suggestions please reach out to me personally: [email protected].

 

Sincerely,

R.J. Huneke

 

P.S. There will be some giveaways and contests coming for email subscribers and RW Book Case enthusiasts, so stay tuned!

Chuck Palahniuk: THE INVENTION OF SOUND Loudly Grips Readers

Chuck Palahniuk: THE INVENTION OF SOUND Loudly Grips Readers

Chuck Palahniuk: THE INVENTION OF SOUND loudly grips readers in the author’s newest thrilling and genre-defying resonation.

What a premise: A father’s decades-long search for his missing daughter. A young woman about to engineer the perfect scream.

The most dangerous secret Hollywood has ever kept.

It is difficult to describe the complex, yet beautifully scripted story of revenge or redemption, of murder or madness that ensues in the land of Hollywood’s darkest alleys and brightest-lit red carpet premieres in Chuck Palahniuk’s newest novel The Invention Of Sound.

The story is woven together out of many tangled and disjointed threads and unreliable points of view that collectively form as impactful and gutting a tale as Fight Club, Diary, or any of the great stories from Chuck Palahniuk.

This book will floor you and/or make you pass out (likely smiling).

That much is conveyed by the cover’s spattered watermelon.

Once you smash the watermelon, you cannot remake the sound of splatter, or piece back together the fragile fruit once held within.

Once the entire story of The Invention Of Sound is told you cannot unknow or forget the frightening ‘trade knowledge’ and mayhem that sounds so thunderously.

Here is the story synopsis, and the book review continues below:


From Goodreads.com:

Original Title: The Invention of Sound

ISBN 1538718006 (ISBN13: 9781538718001)

Hardcover, 240 pages

Published September 8th 2020 by Grand Central Publishing

Gates Foster lost his daughter, Lucy, seventeen years ago. He’s never stopped searching. Suddenly, a shocking new development provides Foster with his first major lead in over a decade, and he may finally be on the verge of discovering the awful truth.

Meanwhile, Mitzi Ives has carved out a space among the Foley artists creating the immersive sounds giving Hollywood films their authenticity. Using the same secret techniques as her father before her, she’s become an industry-leading expert in the sound of violence and horror, creating screams so bone-chilling, they may as well be real.

Soon Foster and Ives find themselves on a collision course that threatens to expose the violence hidden beneath Hollywood’s glamorous façade. A grim and disturbing reflection on the commodification of suffering and the dangerous power of art, THE INVENTION OF SOUND is Chuck Palahniuk at the peak of his literary powers—his most suspenseful, most daring, and most genre-defying work yet.


The following TFF Book review of Chuck Palahniuk’s The Invention Of Sound is Spoiler-free*****.

Few books can grab a reader like this one does, and that grip is at times painful as the pages fly.

The Invention Of Sound is utterly riveting, from start to finish.

One could easily read The Invention Of Sound in a couple of long sittings.

The suspense, perverse humor, pervasion fun for fun-sake (or was it?), and the churlish attitudes and deeds of most of the main characters – from Mitzi’s cult-like obsession to a craft she loves and hates, just as she seems to love and hate herself, to the masochistic lengths a father goes to searching for a daughter gone for nearly two decades (and you cringe just reading of his process) – make for some of the most memorable characters and scenes south of the HOLLYWOOD sign in the Hollywood Hills.

For those squeamish of violence and gore, or equally as unnerving, the life of aging actors, be warned, Mr. Palahniuk pulls no punches and crosses new bounds.

The interwoven twists and mysteries grow clearer and hazier as each additional page goes bye.

And with a wallop the ending does not disappoint as it screams oh so delightfully.

The Invention of Sound, Chuck Palahniuk, Fight Club, fiction, book review, book reviews, Hollywood

The Forgotten Fiction Grade: YEA (read it!)


Want To Buy The Book from a local bookseller? Click Away!

“Chuck Palahniuk: THE INVENTION OF SOUND Loudly Grips Readers” was written by was written by R.J. Huneke.