I, ROBOT By Isaac Asimov: Book Review Of Science Fiction Classic

I, ROBOT By Isaac Asimov: Book Review Of Science Fiction Classic

I, ROBOT by Isaac Asimov: book review of science fiction classic highlights the prose, storytelling, and stark differences in views regarding this premiere work about robots and AI, aka artificial intelligence.

In Asimov’s I, Robot, Dr. Susan Calvin (robo-pyschologist for U.S. Robots and Mechanical Men Inc.) describes the development of robots, through nine short stories, to a reporter in the 21st century.

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The Following book review of I, Robot by Isaac Asimov is a Spoiler-ful WARNING Level YELLOW: it contains mild spoilers for the novel, but not detailed plot.

When read from beginning to end I, Robot can be seen as an evolution of Asimov’s Robots. Each story shares an interaction between humans and robots and often hints upon the unease of a growing artificial intelligence.

Here is the story synopsis, and the review continues below it.


From penguinrandomhouse.com:

Paperback
Released April 29, 2008 | ISBN 9780553382563

Each story in the book shares an interaction between humans and robots and often hints upon the unease of a growing artificial intelligence.

Asimov’s future (actually our past as his first short story is set in 2015) includes mining stations on asteroids and Mercury, spaceships with hyperdrive, and super computers along with robots taking over simple jobs like farming, while also running for office and even secretly running the world.

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Although nine stories follow Asimov Three Laws of Robotics, many stories describe robots having difficulty with these laws (either by manufacturing defect or meta-cognitive awareness) leading to their eventual interpretation of them – even a so called religion. His infamous laws governing robotic behavior have changed our perception of robots forever.

The three laws of Robotics:
1) A robot may not injure a human being or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm.
2) A robot must obey orders given to it by human beings except where such orders would conflict with the First Law.
3) A robot must protect its own existence as long as such protection does not conflict with the First or Second Law.

Despite the name Hollywood gave the film, I, Robot, starring Will Smith, the book is far from the film in terms of actual story elements, though the film is fun and captures some of the spirit, as well as a couple specific uses of the book.

Spoiler Alert: If you were a fan of the 2004 science fiction action film I, Robot directed by Alex Proyas do not expect many similarities with Isaac Asimov’s 1940-1950 short story collection of the same name. The 2004 film is much more closely based on Jeff Vintar’s original screenplay Hardwired. That film adopts Asimov’s creation of “the three laws of robotics,” shares two similar characters, and borrows one scene from his works.

Overall I, Robot is a thought provoking read, blended well with science-fact and science fiction.

If you have not read the novel, expect a vastly different story than the film with the exception of the chapter titled “Little Lost Rabbit.”

The Forgotten Fiction Grade: YEA (read it!)


About The Author From Goodreads.com:

Isaac Asimov was a Russian-born, American author, a professor of biochemistry, and a highly successful writer, best known for his works of science fiction and for his popular science books.

Professor Asimov is generally considered one of the most prolific writers of all time, having written or edited more than 500 books and an estimated 90,000 letters and postcards. He has works published in nine of the ten major categories of the Dewey Decimal System (lacking only an entry in the 100s category of Philosophy).

Asimov is widely considered a master of the science-fiction genre and, along with Robert A. Heinlein and Arthur C. Clarke, was considered one of the “Big Three” science-fiction writers during his lifetime.

[https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/16667.Isaac_Asimov]


P.S. If You Want To Know A Little More About How The Forgotten Fiction Is Different & Our Mission . . .

We are really trying to achieve two main goals here:

  1. To bolster every author who puts out a work of fiction long after the initial buzz that accompanied its release. This is something that is usually left to an expensive public relations manager or company and even with all of their powers of marketing / PR are limited in where they can place the book months after its launch. This includes limited edition and small press publications, like Suntup Editions, that are also reviewed for their physical beauty, as well as the work’s literary art and often illustrations, so long as the initial work has been out 60 days.
  2. We love books of fiction! And as readers we have too little time to read ALL of the books that fall onto our tentative To-Read List. The Forgotten Fiction hopes that with our Yea or Nay stamp, we can definitively give our unbiased opinion to you as a recommendation that may or may not move a book from the stack to your Must-Read List.

To Read More Details On Our Process Go To The About Page Here.

Want To Buy The Book from a local bookseller? Click Away!

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“I, ROBOT By Isaac Asimov: Book Review Of Science Fiction Classic” was written by Peter Maisano.

Book Review: MICRO By Michael Crichton & Richard Preston WOWs

Book Review: MICRO By Michael Crichton & Richard Preston WOWs

Book Review: Micro By Michael Crichton & Richard Preston WOWs, as young upcoming grad students find themselves heading to Hawaii in pursuit of cutting-edge careers in microbiology a whole new world is opened up to them on the wake of a murder investigation.

The Crichton manuscript and notes for Micro were posthumously delivered to Preston who continued the stunning, thrilling, science-based adventure story Crichton is so well known for.

Preston deserves exceptional credit for delivering the novel with Crichton’s pacing and tone – a work that he would truly be proud of.

Micro, Michael Crichton, Richard Preston, book review

Here is the story synopsis, and the review continues below it.


From michaelcrichton.com:

Hardcover
Published in 2011 by HarperCollins

Paperback
Published in 2012 by HarperCollins

First Edition Release Date: March, 2019

In a locked Honolulu office building, three men are found dead with no sign of struggle except for the ultrafine, razor-sharp cuts covering their bodies. The only clue left behind is a tiny bladed robot, nearly invisible to the human eye.

In the lush forests of Oahu, groundbreaking technology has ushered in a revolutionary era of biological prospecting. Trillions of microorganisms, tens of thousands of bacteria species, are being discovered; they are feeding a search for priceless drugs and applications on a scale beyond anything previously imagined.

In Cambridge, Massachusetts, seven graduate students at the forefront of their fields are recruited by a pioneering microbiology start-up. Nanigen MicroTechnologies dispatches the group to a mysterious lab in Hawaii, where they are promised access to tools that will open a whole new scientific frontier.

But once in the Oahu rain forest, the scientists are thrust into a hostile wilderness that reveals profound and surprising dangers at every turn. Armed only with their knowledge of the natural world, they find themselves prey to a technology of radical and unbridled power. To survive, they must harness the inherent forces of nature itself.


This is a *SPOILER-FUL Review WARNING*

Micro starts with a murder mystery and captivates the reader with gripping action scenes that only get more compelling until the novel ends.

As a Hawaiian tech company’s malicious owner – a crook and a killer – uses his new technology to shrink a group of grad students down to half an inch, they find themselves stranded in the rainforest, in an unknown environment, running from giant insects and other gruesome creatures.

Micro, Michael Crichton, Richard Preston, book review

Michael Crichton doing research for Micro in Hawaii | Photo credit: Sherri Crichton

Charles Darwin’s Survival of the Fittest is law and it takes all of their intellect to survive.

Crichton and Preston take us to a whole new world – delightful imagery, chilling predators, and a new ecosystem.

They show their love for the natural world, but remind the readers of its explicit cruelty. The authors adopt a shocking realism. Characters are picked off right and left, sometimes without warning, and in the cruelest of ways.

An argument can be made for one dimensional characters; but heroic rescues always make up for character flaws.

Micro, Michael Crichton, Richard Preston, book review

A page of Michael Crichton’s handwritten Micro notes

Crichton died in 2008 at the age of 66. He was writing thrillers in medical school under the pen name John Lange.

His novels often blend medical and technological elements with adventure and violence. Upon his death, he left this unfinished manuscript, including detailed plot outlines and notes, with Richard Preston, himself a respected author of science-related novels such as The Hot Zone.

All in all, Micro ensures all readers will reflect upon the beauty and horror of the natural world. Especially if/when a villain has the technology to create micro-drones that could kill any leader on Earth.

 

The Forgotten Fiction Grade: YEA (read it!)

 

Click to Shop your local indie bookstore for MICRO

P.S. If You Want To Know A Little More About How The Forgotten Fiction Is Different & Our Mission . . .

We are really trying to achieve two main goals here:

  1. To bolster every author who puts out a work of fiction long after the initial buzz that accompanied its release. This is something that is usually left to an expensive public relations manager or company and even with all of their powers of marketing / PR are limited in where they can place the book months after its launch. This includes limited edition and small press publications, like Suntup Editions, that are also reviewed for their physical beauty, as well as the work’s literary art and often illustrations, so long as the initial work has been out 60 days.
  2. We love books of fiction! And as readers we have too little time to read ALL of the books that fall onto our tentative To-Read List. The Forgotten Fiction hopes that with our Yea or Nay stamp, we can definitively give our unbiased opinion to you as a recommendation that may or may not move a book from the stack to your Must-Read List.

To Read More Details On Our Process Go To The About Page Here.

“Book Review: MICRO By Michael Crichton & Richard Preston WOWs” was written by Peter Maisano for The Forgotten Fiction.

Ania Ahlborn’s Brother Astounds In Limited Suntup Editions

Ania Ahlborn’s Brother Astounds In Limited Suntup Editions

Ania Ahlborn’s Brother astounds in limited Suntup Editions, and both the visceral, chilling work of horror and the incredible physical manifestation of the book from Suntup are reviewed here.

A short summation of the book review of Brother is that it is a brilliant novel and work of art.

And Suntup Editions crafted it into palpable art for book lovers to grasp in-hand.

Few tales really grab you, wringing your stomach repeatedly, like Brother does.

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Here is the story synopsis as seen on Suntup Editions’ website, Suntup.press, and the review continues below:


Synopsis:

Brother is the terrifying tale of a family’s disturbing traditions, and of one brother’s determination to break free from all he has ever known. In a crooked farmhouse off the beaten path and miles away from civilization live the Morrows. A band of eccentric recluses, the family keeps to themselves so as not to be questioned by local police when girls go missing from the side of the highway. But nineteen-year-old Michael Morrow is different. He derives no pleasure in the screams that echo through the trees.

Michael pines for a life of normalcy and to see a world beyond that of West Virginia. In the nearby town of Dahlia, Michael meets Alice, a pretty girl working at a record shop. He is immediately smitten, but his family is all too eager to remind him of the monster he is.

Hailed by critics as “impossible to put down,” Ahlborn delivers all the guilt, guts, and gore of family drama as Michael fights to attain the life he longs for. [credit: Suntup.press]


Both the story itself and the hardcover books are inspired.

From the opening screams, and the lack of surprise at those screams, Brother has you.

Ania Ahlborn’s Brother transcends all kinds of fiction genre labels, as horror, suspense, psychological thriller, and gore converge, and that is part of what makes this work so damn good.

Ahlborn seizes on the psyche of nineteen-year-old protagonist, Michael Morrow, to tell her bone-chilling tale, and he is utterly compelling.

Michael is a walking dichotomy: he is both full of dread and hope, seemingly gold of heart and yet a part of humanity at its most hideous; his brother Reb takes jabs at Michael being slow in the uptake throughout the book and yet Michael shows signs of swift insightfulness; he is a romantic at heart and extremely naïve, despite seeing atrocities the likes of which few can imagine in their nightmares and the self-hatred he has for being a part of them.

The setting is the 1980’s in the rural wooded country of West Virginia, and the fervent characters that live there are primarily seen from the point of view of Michael Morrow.

And seeing through that lens makes for an endlessly intriguing, albeit disturbing, voyage.

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Limited edition photography by Paul Michael Kane.

*SPOILER WARNING*

You only have to start the book to find yourself jumping at the sound of Mama’s voice.

Michael is woken to the sounds of a young woman in distress, but what is immediately striking is that it is the sound that it is alarming to him.

He abhors the sound, but he is also so familiar with it that he is numb to the frantic plea.

The gravity of the future murder is there, and he is upset but oddly removed from her, even as he feels for the young woman’s plight.

Michael more bemoans the fact that he needs to be ready to rise from his bed in the middle of the night and do Mama Morrow’s bidding.

fine press, small press, suntup editions, brother, Ania Ahlborn, Paul Suntup, Suntup, book review, book reviews

Limited edition photography by Paul Michael Kane.

When the young woman gets loose and flees through the trees, trying desperately to escape, you cannot help to get out of breath yourself as the vivid view from under the trees and the inner monologue of Michael draw you in.

He is the fastest runner among the Morrows, and so he must do as his adopted family commands: catch the girl so Mama can have her way with the young woman before she is literally butchered so the Morrows can make steaks and other things from her.

Michael does not want to be a part of it.

But he is so frightened of what Mama will do if he does not comply, he cannot see that he has any option but to obey.

He cleans up afterward and slices up and stores the cuts of meat.

It is as it has always been at his adopted family’s farmhouse.

The Morrows saved him from an abandoned home, and he was put into the keeping of his older brother who likes to be called Rebel, or Reb.

Reb has bullied Michael for so long, incessantly, that the reader jumps whenever Reb looks Michael’s way or says anything.

The brother terrifies him to the point of paranoia that is justified and the verbal abuse is truly just the smallest glimpse into the wickedness that the eldest son of the longtime cannibalistic family, the Morrows, brings to the story.

As Michael’s brother mixes truths and lies and starts to take his little brother to meet girls – not to scout for more victims, but to get them both dates – the horror of a twisting narrative full of insanely painful and blood-spattered experiences warps the psychological reality of a young man yearning for normalcy.

One microcosm of beauty from this story comes as a girl that Michael likes lends him a record of The Cure from the store she works at, and when he listens to it his entire soul erupts in happiness and his mind opens as it has never done before.

And then things go horribly, horribly wrong as his sister begins to dance and loses control.

*SPOILERS END HERE*

The grit in the writing is so real your hands feel scraped as you put the book down.

To take such a narrative to ever-increasing emotional highs and lows over the course of a detailed terrain, a world built to entrap the reader in its dangerous twists, is sensational.

This book is not for those who are squeamish at the sight of blood, and be warned you may find yourself choked up, nauseous, cheering, and crying all within a short span while reading.

For fiction fans, and in particular horror fans, you may have a new favorite book and author on your hands.

Brother feels as though it really happened, and that scares the hell out of me.

There is no escape from one’s brother . . . Or is there? But the cost . . .

Suntup Editions Numbered State Of Brother Is One Of The Closest Examples Of A Physical Book Possessed By A Story

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While I am sure the Suntup Editions lettered edition of Brother by Ania Ahlborn is also a fantastic work of art that emanates the dark tale, this review now shifts its focus to the fine press signed and numbered state.

What Paul Suntup has conjured for Brother is nothing short of remarkable.

The cover is like a fine cigar wrapper, smooth and yet full of a crinkly texture and its colors of brown and black produce a one of a kind effect for each book.

I have never held anything like this book in my hand!

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Limited edition photography by Paul Michael Kane.

The cover boards were constructed by Andrea Peterson, and each is formed via a custom handmade Walnut rag cotton paper has been coated with black walnut dye from the trees of the print artist’s own homestead.

Some softening and shellac seal the walnut and then standing bright amongst the deep tones are the title and author’s name in two hits of foil stamping.

I treasure this book.

The slipcase is heavy, hard, like acacia hardwood, and not only protects but beautifully represents the toughness from the work it encompasses.

Moving to within the pages, the endsheets are Hahnemühle Bugra and have a great feel to the palm and the paper is off-white and also excellent in the hand.

On top of the finest book design a fine press can deliver – from the chapter headings to the font and all of it – Brother features six full-color illustrations by World Fantasy Award winner Samuel Araya.

And these images conjure up a surrealistic quality that is unique and combines the weird beauty with the horrific intensity of Brother.

I cannot understate two things here:

The cover alone seems to project the novel within and is a special rare book collectors will pine over.

Two: because Suntup Editions decided to give a great book that had only previously been available in paperback a hardback en masse there were 500 copies made and signed of the numbered state of Brother and amazingly enough, because most of Suntup’s numbered books are limited to 250 or less, there are a few copies still available for sale here: https://suntup.press/brother.

Since nearly all of Suntup’s books have sold out, and most do at the hour of pre-sale (the last in less than three minutes), this fantastic edition of Brother is an anomaly ripe for the taking.

The Forgotten Fiction Grade: YEA (read BROTHER! And if you can read the Suntup Editions numbered state)

Here is an unboxing video done by our local professional unboxer Jeff Terry if you want to get a feel for what it is like to open up A Suntup Editions box and behold Brother in HD video:


ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Born in Ciechanow Poland, Ania Ahlborn has always been drawn to the darker, mysterious, and morbid side of life. Her earliest childhood memory is of crawling through a hole in the chain link fence that separated her family home from a large wooded cemetery, where she’d spend hours among the headstones, breaking up bouquets of silk flowers so everyone had their equal share.

Ania’s first novel, Seed, was self-published. It clawed its way up the Amazon charts to the number one horror spot, earning her a multi-book deal and a key to the kingdom of the macabre. Eight years later, she has published ten titles. Her work has been lauded by the likes of Publishers Weekly, New York Daily News, and The New York Times. [credit: Suntup.press]

www.aniaahlborn.com


Illustration © 2019 by Samuel Araya. Brother Limited Editions © 2019 by Suntup Editions*. Brother © 2015 by Ania Ahlborn. Limited edition photography by Paul Michael Kane as credited in captions; the unboxing video is by Jeff Terry; the remaining photography is by R.J. Huneke. Read more about The Contributors to the review article here. *[BROTHER Suntup Editions First Edition Release Date: January 2020; the novel Brother was originally published in paperback in 2015.]


P.S. If You Want To Know A Little More About How The Forgotten Fiction Is Different & Our Mission . . .

We are really trying to achieve two main goals here:

  1. To bolster every author who puts out a work of fiction long after the initial buzz that accompanied its release. This is something that is usually left to an expensive public relations manager or company and even with all of their powers of marketing / PR are limited in where they can place the book months after its launch. This includes limited edition and small press publications, like Suntup Editions, that are also reviewed for their physical beauty, as well as the work’s literary art and often illustrations, so long as the initial work has been out 60 days.
  2. We love books of fiction! And as readers we have too little time to read ALL of the books that fall onto our tentative To-Read List. The Forgotten Fiction hopes that with our Yea or Nay stamp, we can definitively give our unbiased opinion to you as a recommendation that may or may not move a book from the stack to your Must-Read List.

To Read More Details On Our Process Go To The About Page Here.

“Ania Ahlborn’s Brother Astounds In Limited Suntup Editions” was written by R.J. Huneke for The Forgotten Fiction.

 

Book Review: The Institute Is One Of Stephen King’s Best

Book Review: The Institute Is One Of Stephen King’s Best

Book Review: The Institute is one of Stephen King’s best, and that is saying something among the 60+ novels and myriad works of art he has created.

Choosing a novel for the inaugural The Forgotten Fiction book review was tough.

But The Institute by Stephen King is truly a remarkable work of fiction that resonates with the Constant Reader, and I felt it was a great recent work to highlight in our review kick-off.

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In The Institute, King’s story-telling is poignant, his characters – and many of them, at that – are utterly real and visceral.

PLEASE NOTE: The following book review is *SPOILER FREE* and discussion of the plot is tread upon lightly for the sake of readers that have not yet opened the book.

The Institute sheds labels and stands alone as a tightly woven work of suspenseful fiction.

Here is the story synopsis from Sai King, and the review continues below it.


From StephenKing.com:

The Institute

Formats: Hardcover, eBook

First Edition Release Date: September, 2019

Synopsis:

In the middle of the night, in a house on a quiet street in suburban Minneapolis, intruders silently murder Luke Ellis’s parents and load him into a black SUV. The operation takes less than two minutes. Luke will wake up at The Institute, in a room that looks just like his own, except there’s no window. And outside his door are other doors, behind which are other kids with special talents—telekinesis and telepathy—who got to this place the same way Luke did: Kalisha, Nick, George, Iris, and ten-year-old Avery Dixon. They are all in Front Half. Others, Luke learns, graduated to Back Half, “like the roach motel,” Kalisha says. “You check in, but you don’t check out.”

In this most sinister of institutions, the director, Mrs. Sigsby, and her staff are ruthlessly dedicated to extracting from these children the force of their extranormal gifts. There are no scruples here. If you go along, you get tokens for the vending machines. If you don’t, punishment is brutal. As each new victim disappears to Back Half, Luke becomes more and more desperate to get out and get help. But no one has ever escaped from the Institute.

As psychically terrifying as Firestarter, and with the spectacular kid power of It, The Institute is Stephen King’s gut-wrenchingly dramatic story of good vs. evil in a world where the good guys don’t always win.

Notes:

On Sale: September 10th, 2019

Page Count: 576


The horror within The Institute certainly grips you.

But this is not strictly a book of ‘horror,’ though there are many horrific things depicted therein.

Rather the book is parts thriller and science fiction, and like many of the author’s books that have been labeled ‘horror,’ it a cross-genre work at its heart.

Support Independent Bookstores - Visit IndieBound.org

The story contains a number of truly wicked and unsettling depictions of humanity, including the Nazi-like experimentation on children and young adults with psychic abilities.

But there is also a remarkable resilience and a compassion of human character in the tale too.

Overcoming the odds while remaining a morally-centered young person may or may not be possible for the likes of Luke Ellis and company.

The protagonist Luke is twelve-years-old.

From his experiences as an extremely bright kid that is ever seeking mental challenges to his courageous new best friend under the dire circumstances of imprisonment, Kalisha, to the good cop driven off the job, Tim, all stand apart in myriad ways.

And then there is ten-year-old Avery Dixon who is much younger than the majority of teenagers with telekinetic and psychic powers that have unwantonly been abducted and then inducted into the place they all refer to simply as the Institute.

For a boy to go through being separated from his parents and kidnapped and then tested upon, such atrocities, such utter emotional devastation, as does Avery, it pulls at and tightens the chest with anxiety for this kid as the story unfolds.

Numerous surprises occur in the plot and they often catch the prisoners in the Institute off guard, to say the least.

You feel for the characters in the book, and you grow to utterly despise most of the ones that are working for The Institute.

Few people have ever creeped me out like Mrs. Sigsby, or her remote, soft-spoken boss.

The troop of doctors appear to be enjoying their work with human lab rats and the attendants are all very aware that they have participated in the kidnapping and torturing of children.

The labs, the Institute itself, becomes one of the most impactful characters in the work.

The book’s setting largely takes place inside a hidden laboratory facility with multiple buildings and prison-like security that is hidden in an isolated forest area in Maine.

It is a whole other level of creepy, in terms of both the psychological elements in the surroundings, from retro posters hinting at the age of the place and their consistently warped messages, and the feel of the old-time secret underground cold war lab that has survived in the 21st century.

And the methods for getting the children to comply with the Institute’s rules and orders, carrot and stick methods, would be heinous if they were done to adults. Yet they are being done to kids.

You can feel the heavy cement of the compound’s outer walls as if they were rough under your hand.

It is truly a fortress meant to prevent kids from escaping and to prevent them from being found.

Readers grow to hate the Institute, to hate that god-awful place, just as the characters do.

As Sai King says, the characters come to life and choose their path, making the story.

The Institute even has an air of Huck Finn and Tom Sawyer adventuring to it, though this is bleaker in some ways than Mark Twain’s classics.

For one thing, the protagonist Luke Ellis will almost surely experience PTSD the likes of which Tom and Huck could not have ever fathomed.

I see The Institute as a story tied to a King masterpiece, Firestarter, though there are stark differences between the two.

Firestarter has been a great influence on pop culture, and especially the Netflix show Stranger Things, and I would not be surprised if The Institute becomes another great influencer as time goes on.

The Institute is a gem of a tale!

To say Stephen King is a prolific writer, is a given, but his writing is phenomenal.

There is no one like Stephen King.

That is not to say that all of his books are favorites of mine, don’t murder me Constant Readers, but I do appreciate all of his works, his top-notch level of writing, the fully-fleshed innumerable characters he creates, and the master storytelling, even in those tales that do not resonate as strongly with me.

And many of his books are among my favorite works of literature, of all-time, and The Institute has become one of these, just as Firestarter is.

And as we head further into 2020’s Coronavirus social distancing self-quarantines with more reading time on our hands, anyone who has not given this book a read, or a re-read, may want to peruse this Spoiler-Free book review and feel inspired to read the newest (from 2019) from the author of The Stand.

At over sixty novels, The Institute proves Stephen King is still at his best.

The Forgotten Fiction Grade: YEA (read it!)

Support Independent Bookstores - Visit IndieBound.org

Shop your local indie bookstore for The Institute 

P.S. If You Want To Know A Little More About How The Forgotten Fiction Is Different & Our Mission . . .

We are really trying to achieve two main goals here:

  1. To bolster every author who puts out a work of fiction long after the initial buzz that accompanied its release. This is something that is usually left to an expensive public relations manager or company and even with all of their powers of marketing / PR are limited in where they can place the book months after its launch. This includes limited edition and small press publications, like Suntup Editions, that are also reviewed for their physical beauty, as well as the work’s literary art and often illustrations, so long as the initial work has been out 60 days.
  2. We love books of fiction! And as readers we have too little time to read ALL of the books that fall onto our tentative To-Read List. The Forgotten Fiction hopes that with our Yea or Nay stamp, we can definitively give our unbiased opinion to you as a recommendation that may or may not move a book from the stack to your Must-Read List.

To Read More Details On Our Process Go To The About Page Here.

 

“Book Review: The Institute is one of Stephen King’s best” was written by R.J. Huneke for The Forgotten Fiction.