First RW Rare Book Gunslinger Case Ships, Contests & More!

First RW Rare Book Gunslinger Case Ships, Contests & More!

First RW Rare Book Gunslinger Case Ships, Contests & More!

In this holiday, Festivus, Winter Solstice week, I have exciting news at The Forgotten Fiction HQ.

The happenings: the newest review for The Forgotten Fiction magazine, the first ever Rune Works Rare Book Case “Gunslinger” Roman Numeral #’d I of XIX being ready and shipped out to a dear friend, and another case comes to my own shelves . . .

Let’s get into it!

Happy Festivus! “I got a lot of problems with you people! And you’re gonna hear about!”

Grievances aside, the next book to be reviewed for TFF will be none other than the Amaranthine Books Dracula – Transylvania Edition!

Here is a sneak peak of it from Amaranthine’s site here:

Dracula, bram stoker, amaranthine books, fine press

This book is a favorite of mine, and their edition is stunning!

The lush Count’s fabric cover and the incredibly macabre art and every unique detail made me buy this limited edition of 666 numbered copies.

The book review will be up in the next week.

Fine presses and small presses are dear to my heart, and anyone and everyone involved in making books. These special works of art encompass our favorite works and inspirations in a way that is not easily described.

And so my own art of woodworking and making by hand, including hand painted accents in the engravings, led me to build my first “Gunslinger” RW Book Case for a friend and I mailed it out Monday.

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It is numbered roman numeral I of XIX, a limited edition for a design I will retire after XIX are built.

I am adding pictures here and at the bottom of the RW Book Case page on the TFF site, click HERE, a “Pictures In Progress” Section, as I always enjoy seeing the process of things being made.

And what is more, today was my Born On Date for the fully cured first creation of the “Bachman Books” RW Book Case, and my books have finally been inserted to their new home and the US first editions of the Stephen King’s alter ego are now back with their UK comrade (and one of my favorite all time covers, a Like New copy of The Long Walk).

Rune Works Rare Book Case, Custom Book Case, custom slipcase, hand-made, Dolso, stephen king, suntup, clamshell book case, archival safe, the gunslinger, the dark tower, rune works rare book cases

What a week this is! And I also had my first ever TFF Giveaway Contest on Facebook and Twitter and am mailing out a handmade pen holder and sign with the homage to the first edition Grant cover of The Gunslinger!

Check out the post on the Facebook page here and congratulate the first ever TFF Winner.

I will be announcing a new giveaway contest on New Year’s Day. Lots of little prizes and surprises I am throwing in with all of my work too…I have some talented friends.

Now I decided to include one pen holder for anyone I give a case to, and so I am extending the pen holder limitation to XX out of XCIX. So numbers up to 99 are for sale ($25-ish if someone wanted one) and if interested please contact me.

These pen holders have a nice deep engraving that you can feel even after the clear coat is applied. It is a fun texture, especially the Slinger’s bullet-blasted title!

pen holder, rw case, rune works rare book case, the forgotten fic tion, tff

The winner, John, is getting roman numeral XX of the Slinger pen holder, but the rest are up for grabs as of today; just email or PM me.

I think that is it for now, but I have big things in the works! More writers are readying their book reviews and more cases are in development and readying to go out into the wild.

If you have any input, ideas or thoughts, please share them with me and the TFF readers’ community here: https://www.facebook.com/theforgottenfiction/

 

   Happy Holidays and Happy New Year!

 

Sincerely,

 

R.J.H.

Easy Go By John Lange (Michael Crichton) A 4/5 Star Adventure

Easy Go By John Lange (Michael Crichton) A 4/5 Star Adventure

Easy Go By John Lange (Michael Crichton) A 4/5 Star Adventure is a Spoiler-free Book Review.

Beneath the sands of the Egyptian desert lies treasure beyond imagining. If you found a hidden message deciphered from hieroglyphics would you dispatch a treasure hunt?

How would you fund the dig and sell the treasure?

Who would you trust to hire?

Barnaby, an astute archeologist with a specialization in hieroglyphics, finds himself in this peculiar situation.

By pure happenstance, he puts trust in someone he would have never expected to: a bold journalist who proved to have connections and all the answers.

Here is the story synopsis, and the book review continues below:


From Goodreads.com:

Beneath the sands of the Egyptian desert lies treasure beyond imagining. And when a professor of archaeology finds clues to the location of a Pharaoh’s lost tomb in ancient hieroglyphs, he hatches a plan to find the burial site – and plunder it.

But can a five-man team of smugglers and thieves uncover what the centuries have hidden? And even if they find it, can they escape with it…and with their lives?

 

Original Title: Easy Go

Author: John Lange (Pseudonym), Michael Crichton

Paperback, 276 pages
Published October 29th 2013 by Hard Case Crime (first published 1968)

The following TFF book review of John Lange’s Easy Go is Spoiler-free*****.

easy go, Michael Crichton, john lange, hard case crime

Would they pull off the largest archeological heist in history? Can a five-man team of smugglers and thieves uncover what centuries have hidden?

And even if they find it, can they smuggle it…and escape with their lives?

Easy Go is an adventure novel about a small group of thieves who find information about the hiding place of the last tomb of the Pharaohs, secretly excavate the tomb, and make plans to escape with the treasure from Egypt.

The story of this heist, told with humor, is reminiscent of an Oceans Eleven scheme.

This read is among Crichton’s earlier works, and this novel is not a masterpiece but it is a fun, quick, worthwhile read.

Critics argue it suffers from a number of flaws both in terms of character development and in terms of the plot. However, keeping in mind this was written in a medical student’s free time, the story flows well and the discovery of the tombs is quite compelling.

Easy Go was Crichton’s third published novel while he was enrolled at Harvard Medical School in 1968 as John Lange.

The Andromeda Strain was released the previous year and published under his real name. Before abandoning the practice in 1972, while writing The Terminal Man, Michael Crichton actually published 10 of his first 11 titles under pseudonyms such as John Lange and Jeffery Hudson. While two of those titles were eventually republished under his own name, the rest were abandoned to the dusty shelves of used bookstores around the world, becoming collectibles for those who knew what to look for.

Ultimately, it’s not going to make you forget the likes of Jurassic Park or State of Fear, nevertheless Easy Go is an amusing little adventure that offers some compelling glimpses of the Crichton we’ve come to appreciate.

The Forgotten Fiction Grade: YEA (read it!)


Want To Buy The Book from a local bookseller? Click Away!

 

 

“Easy Go By John Lange (Michael Crichton) A 4/5 Star Adventure” was written by Peter Maisano.

 

 

Welcome to the TFF & RW Book Case NEWS Section

Welcome to the TFF & RW Book Case NEWS Section

Welcome to the TFF & RW Book Case NEWS Section!

As The Forgotten Fiction magazine grows, so do the reviews of books 60+ days old and small press editions. And right along with that review of the literary and bibliophile art are the increasing Rune Works Book Case projects: art to encompass and protect art.

I thought it only fair to begin a dialogue here, that will also be shared on our social media networks, and will hopefully engage you, the new fans of TFF, to express your thoughts and ideas as well.

There are a lot of books in the works to be reviewed!

There are plans in the works for many more classics, contemporary titles, and small and fine press editions to be examined on TFF in-depth.

I will list some of the likely prospects that are already on the radar below.

And as the literary arts spread, so to has the handmade wooden RW Book Cases and the plans and new projects in the fire are already growing vast for the forging.

I want to personally ask all of you who are tuning in to reach out in any way you like to express your thoughts on what is being done at TFF and what you would like to see done.

I implore you all, eager readers, to make your voices heard! It is infinitely more fun that way.

Since this is the inaugural TFF & RW Book Case NEWS post, I wanted to introduce myself very briefly.

My name is R.J. Huneke, I founded The Forgotten Fiction, and I have been a published author for decades now. My first job ass a reviewer case as a columnist for the New York tabloid Newsday where I did reviews of pop culture and of local bars; I also was a reviewer of books for The Examiner, ScfiNow, Fantasy Matters, and continue to write on and review robotics and gadgetry for Gadizmo. Most of my work has come in the form of short fiction, poetry, and non-fiction articles, though I have been a passionate novelist since I was 19 years old, and my first novel picked up by a publisher, Cyberwar, was released in 2015.

I have a bevy of contributors lining up to write reviews for TFF, and both myself and Peter Maisano will continue to regularly write as well.

Artists including Paul Michael Kane – photography (and whose 19th Edition works of art I often include in cases sent out) – and Jeff Terry – book unboxing extraordinaire – are active on TFF.

All contributors on TFF are talented and unique artists with their own channels for their works, and I encourage you to take a look at their fantastic works – you will not be disappointed.

Now to the fun stuff!

I may be all business – and grammatically anal in my reviews – but I aim to let my humor come out for a much more fun tone in my NEWS posts.

And so . . . to the BOOKS!

The joy of making this platform was that it is open to any book of fiction out 60 days or more. ANY!

The possibilities are endless.

I want the author – who typically gets little to no marketing after 60 days – to benefit, I want the reader who may have missed a classic or two to benefit, and I want the publishers to benefit, since they, too, are hurting in the US.

And to add on to that, I especially want the small press publishers to not just survive but to thrive!

You have kept and engaged so many readers over the years, and you have kept paper books relevant and special works of art for the storied art contained therein and it means the world to us readers.

So you know: first and foremost I am a reader.

I am a Constant Reader, loud and proud.

Rune Works Rare Book Case, Custom Book Case, custom slipcase, hand-made, Dolso, stephen king, suntup, clamshell book case, archival safe, richard bachman, bachman books, rune works rare book cases

And The Forgotten Fiction magazine will be hitting on:

  • Stardust By Neil Gaiman – Lyra’s Books Numbered Edition
  • Bram Stoker’s Dracula – Numbered Edition by Amaranthine Books
  • Later By Stephen King – Numbered Edition By Hard Case Crime
  • A Scanner Darkly By Philip K. Dick – Suntup Editions Numbered and Artist Editions
  • Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury – Suntup Editions Numbered and Artist Editions
  • More Books by Michael Crichton – requests are open, folks!
  • The End Of Eternity By Isaac Asimov (and pictures of a rare first edition)
  • The Time Machine By H.G. Wells – Suntup Edition’s Numbered
  • Killer Come Back To Me the unpublished Ray Bradbury book celebrating Bradbury’s 100th birthday by Hard Case Crime

And so many more books will be reviewed and mixed in with the above, all which will come out in no particular order.

Embrace the chaos of reading!

If that was not exciting enough for me, I love talking and writing about books, there has been a bevy of new woodworking projects I have undertaken.

Most are Rune Works Rare Book Cases, and some are offshoots.

One such offshoot is a one-time wooden and engraved sign for Stephen King’s The Stand to accompany the book case being built and many of the Eager Readers of The Forgotten Fiction will have an opportunity to get one, since it is not a case, I will make more than the 19 limited that I keep to for cases (I am thinking 100 right now).

It will be awesome! Sneak-peak coming today or tomorrow right before the new mini-series airs!

Back to the cases. I am currently working on the following:

  • The Gunslinger cases
  • The Lord Of The Rings ACE First Edition case
  • “Gunslinger” Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction cases
  • A I of I creation customized for an issue of Astounding Fiction from 1953
  • Startling Mystery 1967 and 1969 Case
  • The Stand case – one for UK and one for US 1st printings
  • Fight Club case
  • Revival Us First Edition for signed copies
  • End Of Watch Us First Edition for signed copies
  • If It Bleeds Us First Edition for signed copies
  • The End Of Eternity case
  • “The Four Bachman Books” cases
  • And even a non-book case for a rare Star Wars Lego piece!

As you can see things are heating up at the forge, and I thank you all for your time, your enthusiasm, your love of great works of fiction, and your pushing me to show this art to the world.

Stay tuned to the TFF & RW Book Case NEWS section here.

If you have any ideas, thoughts, or suggestions please reach out to me personally: [email protected].

 

Sincerely,

R.J. Huneke

 

P.S. There will be some giveaways and contests coming for email subscribers and RW Book Case enthusiasts, so stay tuned!

Suntup Reforges A Classic In The Auctioneer By Joan Samson

Suntup Reforges A Classic In The Auctioneer By Joan Samson

Suntup reforges a classic in The Auctioneer by Joan Samson, the 1975 novel that sold over a million copies, went out of print for nearly forty years, and returned to trade publication in 2018.

Suntup Editions, The Auctioneer, Joan Samson, Suntup Editions, fine press, shirley jackson, the lottery

The Auctioneer is a chilling tale of suspense and a literary masterpiece, and Suntup Editions has truly given the book as wild and classy a design as is befitting the story of the Moore’s in Harlowe.

To say the spirit of Joan Samson’s The Auctioneer is vivacious in these pages is an understatement.

Here is the story synopsis from Suntup Editions, and the review continues below it.


One of the finest and bestselling horror novels of the 1970’s, Joan Samson’s The Auctioneer is a chilling masterpiece of terror. In an isolated New Hampshire farming community where little has changed over the past several decades, John Moore and his wife Mim do their best to maintain the family farm and live a modest, hardworking life. But from the moment the charismatic Perly Dunsmore arrives in town, soliciting donations for his auctions, the community of Harlowe slowly and insidiously starts to change. As the auctioneer carries out his terrible, inscrutable plan, the Moores and their neighbors will find themselves gradually but inexorably stripped of their freedom, their possessions, and perhaps even their lives.

Upon its release in 1975, The Auctioneer was received with wide acclaim. Newsday hailed it “a suspenseful, engrossing novel with the most gripping and violent ending we’ve encountered for some time.”

The Auctioneer By Joan Samson

First Published 1975


The level of creepiness seeps in more and more, page by page.

Suntup Editions, The Auctioneer, Joan Samson, Suntup Editions, fine press, shirley jackson, the lottery

And there is something extraordinary about holding the handmade Indiana Wheatstraw paper boards while reading this.

It is such a uniquely fun experience that speaks to the ingenuity of living on a steadily dwindling farmstead, and using the land to get by, or in this case to read the echoes of Harlowe’s rural inhabitants while smelling the sweet forest that gave us the leaves within the gorgeous book.

Suntup Editions, The Auctioneer, Joan Samson, Suntup Editions, fine press, shirley jackson, the lottery

And whatever printer printed this Suntup beauty, she smells sooo good (for all my book sniffers out there; you know who you are).

SPOILER ALERT** For The Following Review Joan Samson’s The Auctioneer.

Suntup Editions, The Auctioneer, Joan Samson, Suntup Editions, fine press, shirley jackson, the lottery

It is not a stretch to compare this book to Shirley Jackson’s short story “The Lottery.”

The tale centers on the small family in the small town falling to imminent ruin thanks to a new resident auctioneer.

Percy Dunsmore is the name that Gore, the one-man police department gives to the protagonists in John and Mim Moore, their young daughter, Hildie, and John’s Ma.

Percy is a man with big ideas for a small town on the fringes of the Boston suburbs where the population boom is pushing crime and more vacationers their way.

Suntup Editions, The Auctioneer, Joan Samson, Suntup Editions, fine press, shirley jackson, the lottery

And his menace is instilled long before the reader ever meets him.

Gore explains that new sheriff deputies are needed – Percy’s idea, John Moore notes – and the auctioneer will be selling off donated goods to the new visiting out-of-towners at a healthy premium to bolster the town.

With a little homely nudging and imploring, Mim and John decide they have something they can do without and give them if it will help.

But every Thursday the demand for goods comes, and the new deputies remark with regret as to the accidents that start befalling any who refuse to give their weekly donation to the auction.

The writing style of Samson is tight and holds a remarkable voice all its own.

What do you do when your most prized possessions are taken out from under you under a tense threat?

What befalls the land, the cows, the children?

The maddening fright of the Moores in their plight, as the town around them is gutted, as they struggle to eat, and plan escape or an effective rebuttal is so realistic and so alarming that it carries a swelling anxiety that dials in on the reader more and more as the story continues.

The pacing is terrific and the suspense leaves you breathless.

And the book is written in a way that it could take place during any time frame in New England, as it represents interesting and intense characters in a small town we may not all be from, but we could all have visited or at least imagine.

The graceful description of the land, the pond, the pines, and the rustic interiors on the Moore’s farm all frame a fully fleshed world full of sounds and smells.

It feels so real.

At the halfway point, it seems anything can happen, any evil can come from the sharp smiling auctioneer for his private gain and any cost could be reaped to do so for the residents of Harlowe.

The madness of action sweeps over John Moore a few times, but he never succeeds in starting anything except a small fire that inspires the town.

The edginess that swallows the reader as his wife and mother wait for the deputies to come for the arsonist soon becomes a panic, as Mim continues to, despite boiling and scrubbing all of his clothes, smell gasoline in their kitchen.

The word that comes to mind as the town summons its inner fury, its Shirley Jackson-like “The Lottery” spirit, is realistic.

Crowd mentality is a real thing and the mayhem that ensues, and especially the wily fox’s getaway while the town lights its own on fire alive is the last thing I expected and quite spectacular.

The closing lines speaking of where the snowflakes fall is poignant and impactful.

Review of Suntup Numbered Limited Edition Of The Auctioneer

Suntup goes far beyond the fine press treatment with the three limited editions of The Auctioneer of which the numbered edition of 250 will be reviewed here.

Suntup Editions, The Auctioneer, Joan Samson, Suntup Editions, fine press, shirley jackson, the lottery

The original cover art by Wendell Minor is included along with new pieces from the cover artist of Stephen King’s novel Salem’s Lot, Dave Christensen, a forward from Ms. Samson’s widowed husband, Warren C. Carberg, Jr., and a preface by New York Times bestselling author and screenwriter Grady Hendrix.

And what is more, Paul Suntup, Rebecca (Ninja) and their team brought forth three magnificent limited editions in a stunning lettered and a gorgeous artist gift edition (AGE) featuring the brilliant original cover art by Wendell Minor.

As these have yet to ship, I will stick to the numbered edition of Samson’s The Auctioneer and the sheer fun in just holding this copy hits home.

To read of such a small-town American horror story and continually brush against the handmade Indiana Wheatstraw paper boards that are somewhat pebbled and smooth and rough at the same time is remarkable.

The layout, the font setting, the paper, the old-fashioned illustrations that almost seem cut from a wood panel made up of the same art with Grady’s cover art, are all perfect for this great novel.

The heart-wrenching opening from Joan’s widowed husband is moving beyond words.

The careful thought and attention to every detail of this work has once again shown the shine of Suntup Editions.

This is a truly befitting homage and work of art to house such a work of art as was the great Joan Samson’s The Auctioneer.

 

The Forgotten Fiction Grade: YEA (read ’em and buy ’em)!


And if you feel you missed out, the AGE of The Auctioneer is not yet sold out – get it here: https://suntup.press/the-auctioneer

 

“Suntup Reforges A Classic In The Auctioneer By Joan Samson” was written by R.J. Huneke.

 

 

 

Chuck Palahniuk: THE INVENTION OF SOUND Loudly Grips Readers

Chuck Palahniuk: THE INVENTION OF SOUND Loudly Grips Readers

Chuck Palahniuk: THE INVENTION OF SOUND loudly grips readers in the author’s newest thrilling and genre-defying resonation.

What a premise: A father’s decades-long search for his missing daughter. A young woman about to engineer the perfect scream.

The most dangerous secret Hollywood has ever kept.

It is difficult to describe the complex, yet beautifully scripted story of revenge or redemption, of murder or madness that ensues in the land of Hollywood’s darkest alleys and brightest-lit red carpet premieres in Chuck Palahniuk’s newest novel The Invention Of Sound.

The story is woven together out of many tangled and disjointed threads and unreliable points of view that collectively form as impactful and gutting a tale as Fight Club, Diary, or any of the great stories from Chuck Palahniuk.

This book will floor you and/or make you pass out (likely smiling).

That much is conveyed by the cover’s spattered watermelon.

Once you smash the watermelon, you cannot remake the sound of splatter, or piece back together the fragile fruit once held within.

Once the entire story of The Invention Of Sound is told you cannot unknow or forget the frightening ‘trade knowledge’ and mayhem that sounds so thunderously.

Here is the story synopsis, and the book review continues below:


From Goodreads.com:

Original Title: The Invention of Sound

ISBN 1538718006 (ISBN13: 9781538718001)

Hardcover, 240 pages

Published September 8th 2020 by Grand Central Publishing

Gates Foster lost his daughter, Lucy, seventeen years ago. He’s never stopped searching. Suddenly, a shocking new development provides Foster with his first major lead in over a decade, and he may finally be on the verge of discovering the awful truth.

Meanwhile, Mitzi Ives has carved out a space among the Foley artists creating the immersive sounds giving Hollywood films their authenticity. Using the same secret techniques as her father before her, she’s become an industry-leading expert in the sound of violence and horror, creating screams so bone-chilling, they may as well be real.

Soon Foster and Ives find themselves on a collision course that threatens to expose the violence hidden beneath Hollywood’s glamorous façade. A grim and disturbing reflection on the commodification of suffering and the dangerous power of art, THE INVENTION OF SOUND is Chuck Palahniuk at the peak of his literary powers—his most suspenseful, most daring, and most genre-defying work yet.


The following TFF Book review of Chuck Palahniuk’s The Invention Of Sound is Spoiler-free*****.

Few books can grab a reader like this one does, and that grip is at times painful as the pages fly.

The Invention Of Sound is utterly riveting, from start to finish.

One could easily read The Invention Of Sound in a couple of long sittings.

The suspense, perverse humor, pervasion fun for fun-sake (or was it?), and the churlish attitudes and deeds of most of the main characters – from Mitzi’s cult-like obsession to a craft she loves and hates, just as she seems to love and hate herself, to the masochistic lengths a father goes to searching for a daughter gone for nearly two decades (and you cringe just reading of his process) – make for some of the most memorable characters and scenes south of the HOLLYWOOD sign in the Hollywood Hills.

For those squeamish of violence and gore, or equally as unnerving, the life of aging actors, be warned, Mr. Palahniuk pulls no punches and crosses new bounds.

The interwoven twists and mysteries grow clearer and hazier as each additional page goes bye.

And with a wallop the ending does not disappoint as it screams oh so delightfully.

The Invention of Sound, Chuck Palahniuk, Fight Club, fiction, book review, book reviews, Hollywood

The Forgotten Fiction Grade: YEA (read it!)


Want To Buy The Book from a local bookseller? Click Away!

“Chuck Palahniuk: THE INVENTION OF SOUND Loudly Grips Readers” was written by was written by R.J. Huneke.

Artemis Fowl Is A Great Place To Get Lost Into Another World

Artemis Fowl Is A Great Place To Get Lost Into Another World

“Artemis Fowl is a great place to get lost into another world” Book Review Contains **SPOILERS.

Artemis Fowl by Eion Colfer is the first in a line of an action-packed, technology-meets-fantasy best-selling children series of books. The protagonist Artemis – a charming twelve-year-old millionaire criminal mastermind – takes on the race of fairies to steal their gold.

Although criminalistic, Artemis’ intentions are to support his family during a stressful time.

His father’s similar unlawful schemes have encouraged a kidnapping that has estranged Artemis’ mother to a downward spiral of mental illness and plummeted the family finances.

Driven by power and money, Artemis is a devious and often cruel antihero, but there’s definitely good in there . . . somewhere.

Here is the story synopsis, and the review continues below it.


From Goodreads.com:

Paperback, 396 pages
Published April 1st 2003 by Disney-Hyperion (first published April 26th 2001)
Twelve-year-old Artemis Fowl is a millionaire, a genius, and above all, a criminal mastermind. But even Artemis doesn’t know what he’s taken on when he kidnaps a fairy, Captain Holly Short of the LEPrecon Unit. These aren’t the fairies of bedtime stories—they’re dangerous! Full of unexpected twists and turns, Artemis Fowl is a riveting, magical adventure.

An all-star cast of characters include the massive Eurasian bodyguard, Butler, the dedicated fairy detective, Holly Short, the irate fairy captain, Commander Julius Root, the technological centaur wizard, Foaly, and a charming dwarf thief, Mulch.

Recently, Artemis Fowl was adapted to a movie and released on Disney Plus. If you didn’t enjoy the recent debut, I encourage you to read the novel.

As with most book-to-film adaptations, the book was so much richer.

Furthermore, I whole-heartedly encourage you to read the Artemis Fowl graphic novel, drawn by Andrew Donkin.

Not only a unique rarity amongst book-to-graphic novel adaptations, this particular media allows the reader to see the characters as Eion Colfer envisioned. This adaptation is a fantastic place to step into the Fowl universe.

As for the Fowl series, these nine novels all take on creative challenges and allow Colfer to fully fledge out his characters.

Our irresistible anti-hero begins to thaw that frozen heart and becomes quite the noble hero – one that bridges and protects two divided worlds.

Wit, charm, action, and plot-twists are common themes across volumes.

A hit among children and tweens, these novels often catch the interest and engage older adult fantasy fans – often in the form of parents (but don’t let that stop you).

All in all, Artemis Fowl is an engaging and enjoyable read.

Whether you are a fantasy fiction lover or simply dipping in for the first time, Eion Colfer’s Artemis Fowl – in any format – is a great place to get lost into another world.

Artemis Fowl, fantasy, ya, Eion Colfer

The Forgotten Fiction Grade: YEA (read it!)


Want To Buy The Book from a local bookseller? Click Away!

“Artemis Fowl is a great place to get lost into another world” was written by was written by Peter Maisano.

The Andromeda Evolution: Crichton’s Andromeda Strain Sequel

The Andromeda Evolution: Crichton’s Andromeda Strain Sequel

The Andromeda Evolution: Crichton’s Andromeda Strain sequel, terrifying sequel, has arrived as Daniel H. Wilson finished the late author’s manuscript with the support of the Michael Crichton’s family.

And this begs the question: just how many more Michael Crichton unfinished manuscripts are waiting to be finished in future collaborations?

Wilson, a robotics engineer, is best known for his use of literary wit and technology and is most famous for his ridiculous thriller “Robopcalypse,” so he was an apt choice for collaborating on the late author Chrighton’s sequel to his pandemic-driven novel.

The following review will contain **SPOILERS** for both The Andromeda Strain and The Andromeda Evolution.

The Andromeda Strain, as millions of fans know, describes the panicked efforts to stop the spread of an alien microparticle that first instantly coagulates human blood or induces the harrowing suicide of dozens to only then mutate to dissolve plastics in the upper atmosphere.

Here is the story synopsis, and the review continues below it.


From Goodreads.com:

Hardcover, 384 pages
Published November 12th 2019 by Harper

In 1967, an extraterrestrial microbe came crashing down to Earth and nearly ended the human race. Accidental exposure to the particle—designated The Andromeda Strain—killed every resident of the town of Piedmont, Arizona, save for an elderly man and an infant boy. Over the next five days, a team of top scientists assigned to Project Wildfire worked valiantly to save the world from an epidemic of unimaginable proportions. In the moments before a catastrophic nuclear detonation, they succeeded.

In the ensuing decades, research on the microparticle continued. And the world thought it was safe…

Deep inside Fairchild Air Force Base, Project Eternal Vigilance has continued to watch and wait for the Andromeda Strain to reappear. On the verge of being shut down, the project has registered no activity—until now. A Brazilian terrain-mapping drone has detected a bizarre anomaly of otherworldly matter in the middle of the jungle, and, worse yet, the tell-tale chemical signature of the deadly microparticle.

Project Wildfire is activated, and a diverse team of experts hailing from all over the world is dispatched to investigate the potentially apocalyptic threat. If the Wildfire team can’t reach the quarantine zone, enter the anomaly, and figure out how to stop it, this new Andromeda Evolution will annihilate all life as we know it.


Fifty years later, a mutated strain has dropped in Earth’s atmosphere while a special team of observers maintain Project Eternal Vigilance.

When The Andromeda Evolution opens, a drone spots a metallic-looking shape growing up out of the Amazon jungle, “the whole of it gleaming like a beetle’s waxy shell in the rising midday sun.”

Situated along the equator, this giant structure is located far from any development, deep in an area inhabited only by tribes who have never made contact with modern civilization.

Mass spectrometry data taken by military satellites indicates that the quickly swelling mutation is “an almost exact match to the Andromeda strain.”

A nuclear strike is debated but considered too problematic to be enacted as a “solution.”

A nuclear explosion would feed the anomaly that lives off energy…provoking the declaration:

“We are facing an unknown enemy who is staging an attack over the gulf of a hundred-thousand years and across our solar system and likely the cosmos.

“This is war.”

Humanity’s hope falls on Project Wildfire’s shoulders.

Consisting of a few scientists, the elite Wildfire team tries to keep the planet from being infected while persisting through the perilous jungle landscape that they find they are dangerously ill-equipped to face.

The jungle proves to be an ominous setting with death and misery lurking around every suspenseful corner. Wilson’s background in robotics is illustrated throughout the novel as technological gizmos play a crucial role in the plot.

Crichton would be proud of the culminated novel. His typical style of literary pacing is amplified in this suspenseful rollercoaster – an exponential increase of suspense carries through until the novel’s conclusion.

Near future technology and innovation are present and most appreciating to read.

The Andromeda Evolution is a must-read sequel for The Andromeda Strain fans and the science fiction community.

The Forgotten Fiction Grade: YEA (read it!)


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“IThe Andromeda Evolution: Crichton’s Andromeda Strain Sequel” was written by Peter Maisano.

Suntup Editions Immortalize I AM LEGEND By Richard Matheson

Suntup Editions Immortalize I AM LEGEND By Richard Matheson

Suntup Editions immortalize I AM LEGEND by Richard Matheson with three incredible limited editions and an I AM LEGEND Fine Art Print featuring the same Stanley Meltzoff cover art that was on the Gold Medal Books first edition of the book in 1954.

Oh, the horror! To be the sole survivor of a world-wide vampire and zombie-vampire creating pandemic!

Each of the three Suntup editions are incredible to behold, and we will be reviewing the Suntup Editions Artist Gift Edition of I AM LEGEND by Richard Matheson and the accompanying Limited Edition giclee print.

The Suntup editions are as timeless as the book I AM LEGEND itself.

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I AM LEGEND by Richard Matheson was a first on many levels, as it crafted a post-apocalyptic world where living vampires emerge alongside undead zombie-vampires.

The last man on earth, Robert Neville, is besieged with an incessant danger and terror.

Here is the story synopsis from Suntup Editions, and the review continues below it.


“This may be the most terrifying novel you will ever read.”

This quote from mystery writer William Campbell Gault graced the first edition cover of what would become one of the most influential and adapted works of the 20th century. Originally published in 1954, Richard Matheson’s I Am Legend ushered in a different kind of novel, defying and transcending genre to combine elements of horror and science fiction within a post-apocalyptic frame.

I Am Legend is the story of Robert Neville, who appears to be the sole survivor of a pandemic that has turned the human race into a crossbreed of zombies and vampires. Robert must hunt by day, hide by night, and most importantly, survive.

In 2012, the Horror Writers Association gave I Am Legend the special Vampire Novel of the Century Award. The novel and Richard Matheson are often credited for creating the zombie-vampire genre.

The cover art on that edition was painted (1917-2006), and has become one of the most famous book covers of the genre.

IAL Suntup AGE Illustration © 2019 by Allen Williams. Artist Gift edition cover art by Stanley Meltzoff © 2020 Silverfish Press. [Suntup.press]


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PLEASE NOTE: The following book review is *SPOILER FREE* and discussion of the plot is tread upon lightly for the sake of readers that have not yet opened the book.

Though many more are familiar with the name ‘I AM LEGEND’ since the movie of the same name (little else resembled the book), starring Will Smith, came out, than the book, that should be true of the name Richard Matheson, who exploded onto the horror, science-fiction, and post-apocalyptic fiction scene with his short novel I AM LEGEND in 1954.

It was not ten years after its first publication, only in paperback for 25 cents, that it came out in theaters as The Last Man On Earth, starring Vincent Price (this movie resembled the book), in 1964.

Many great novels had begun to spring from Matheson by this time, but I AM LEGEND truly made an indelible mark on horror tales and fiction itself for that matter.

It is not just the brilliant concepts of the story and the last man, Neville, struggling to make stakes, keep fresh garlic on his home’s door, and cope with the menace that lurks at night that make this book special.

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It is the inner workings of the great character, Robert Neville, that moves the reader, again and again.

The man is tortured.

And he continues to torture himself with thoughts of what was and is clearly deeply depressed.

In the beginning he has three passions: killing the vampires, surviving, and drinking away the dread of it all.

Haunted by his family, now years gone, the lack of human contact while undead females taunt his sexual hunger night after night, and his own neighbor repeatedly yelling his name over the sound of the music Robert uses to try and drown out the cries in the night puts him under a cloud of pressure.

The pressure mounts when ideas of the pandemic being curable take hold, but survival becomes no less difficult.

The relationships Neville gets to form will break your heart.

The world-building – the unending menace, impending calamity, and the pits of burning bodies – is so immersive it is scary, the language use is brilliant, the plot is full of gut-strangling twists, and the ending does not disappoint.

Here is Jeff’s infamous unboxing video of this edition:

The AGE Suntup Edition of I AM LEGEND is a Must-Have.

The limited edition of 1000 copies of I AM LEGEND by Paul Suntup and his brilliant team offer a large full cloth smyth-sewn binding with two-hits foil stamping, and printed endsheets featuring the creepy long-nailed arm of one of the undead.

The crimson red emanates the red used on the original first edition Gold Medal Books made and to further that cause the entire front cover of the dust jacket, sans title or verbiage, is the historic painting by Stanley Meltzoff (1917-2006) from that same original 1954 paperback edition.

The depiction of Neville holding a stake aloft as he looks down at the pit of burning bodies in the piece is timeless.

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It adds so much to the gorgeous AGE book that is signed by the illustrator Allen Williams, whose creepy black and white depictions of the IAL world are haunting equally enthralling.

The book, printed offset, is housed in a printed slipcase with the creepiest vampire hand you will ever see and there is cloth on the upper and lower sections.

The look and feel of the cloth and the gold foil is something truly special in the hand.

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And going back to the cover art: Suntup Editions created an I AM LEGEND Fine Art Print of the Stanley Meltzoff painted cover art, and I had to have it as well.

Limited to just 50 copies, the I AM LEGEND Fine Art Print by Suntup is STILL AVAILABLE here (how or why I do not know)!

Be sure to check out the wild numbered and lettered editions of this book from Suntup too!

Between the art, the care for every aspect of the book, and the impactful work put into all of the Suntup Editions of I AM LEGEND, the publisher has helped to further immortalize a grandfather of dark fiction and one of his most prominent works.

The Forgotten Fiction Grade: YEA (read ’em and buy ’em)!


Want To Buy The I AM LEGEND Fine Art Print by Suntup Editions (or their last numbered book that is NOT SOLD OUT, somehow, Brother by Ania Ahlborn)? Click away!

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“Suntup Editions Immortalize I AM LEGEND By Richard Matheson” was written by R.J. Huneke.

P.S. If You Like The Hand-made Wooden Case For I AM LEGEND…

Check Out Out My Pet Projects, Igor, here.

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P.P.S. If You Want To Know A Little More About How The Forgotten Fiction Is Different & Our Mission . . .

We are really trying to achieve two main goals here:

  1. To bolster every author who puts out a work of fiction long after the initial buzz that accompanied its release and to bolster small press and fine press publishers that make works of art out of the books we love. This includes limited edition and small press publications, like Suntup Editions, that are also reviewed for their physical beauty, as well as the work’s literary art and often illustrations, so long as the initial work has been out 60 days.
  2. We love books of fiction! And as readers we have too little time to read ALL of the books that fall onto our tentative To-Read List. The Forgotten Fiction hopes that with our Yea or Nay stamp, we can definitively give our unbiased opinion to you as a recommendation that may or may not move a book from the stack to your Must-Read List.

To Read More Details On Our Process Go To The About Page Here.

The Long Walk By Richard Bachman (Stephen King) Book Review

The Long Walk By Richard Bachman (Stephen King) Book Review

The Long Walk by Richard Bachman (Stephen King) Book Review takes a look at the first novel Stephen King is said to have ever written, while in college, and was not published until 1979 under the penname of Richard Bachman.

Walking the edge of The Long Walk, as a reader, balances the dichotomies of humanity’s actions toward itself: torturous psychological and physical pain foiled by expectant friendship and self-sacrifice.

And the thematic thumping of the drum of feet on the road!

The Long Walk

The language is sharp and there is certainly a darker, glass-half-full aspect that emanates dystopian tropes in King’s book.

And yet, despite the terrific pacing, the immersive world of The Walk that grips the Constant Reader, King still harnesses such great characters, major and minor, that they make their journey yours, and their life-like aspects are so real they are uncanny.

This is a gift King seems to have had from the first, and this hard hitting tale is a great example.

The seemingly unending walk, the pounding of the pavement, goes on and on as though the reader’s suspense and the characters’ own fears will never end.

After the book review, I will also take a look at the two elusive first edition copies of The Long Walk that came out via paperback editions, in the US under Signet in July 1979 and then in the UK under NEL in September 1980.

Suntup Editions, Gerry Grace, The Long Walk, NEL, Signet, Richard Bachman, Stephen King

PLEASE NOTE: The following book review is *SPOILER FREE* and discussion of the plot is tread upon lightly for the sake of readers that have not yet opened the book.


Here is the story synopsis from Stephen King, and the review continues below it.

From StephenKing.com:

The Long Walk

Formats: softcover, audiobook

First Edition Release Date: by Signet in 1979 (first US edition) and NEL in 1980 (first UK edition)

Synopsis:

In the near future, where America has become a police state, one hundred boys are selected to enter an annual contest where the winner will be awarded whatever he wants for the rest of his life. The game is simple – maintain a steady walking pace of four miles per hour without stopping. Three warnings, and you’re out – permanently. First Edition Release Date: September, 2019


For those looking for an introduction into King’s works, The Long Walk serves up both an insightful glimpse into the human condition, under bleak circumstances, and adds some grimly powerful statements about society as a whole, some of which can certainly be echoed in today’s world.

While many are familiar with The Running Man because of the Arnold Schwarzenegger movie of the same name in the 1980’s (there are few other similarities between the flick and book, one could argue, besides entertainment), few realize that the late Richard Bachman, who, sad to say, succumbed to cancer some years back, spawned some of Stephen King’s finest works, including The Long Walk, Rage, Roadwork, Thinner, and Blaze.

There would have been no Hunger Games without The Long Walk.

In days eerily reflective of our own in America, a police state’s great annual entertainment centers around The Walk, or The Long Walk, contest where 100 teenagers walk from the Maine/Canadian border as far south as it takes to leave one standing.

This is not typical Stephen King horror, though Constant Readers will be quick to point out that “The King of Horror” has written in just about every genre, trope, form of writing, and cross-genre imaginable.

The Long Walk is a near-future dystopian masterpiece of suspense and horror.

The horror here is all in the horrible face of humanity that is shown again and again.

The Walk’s prize is whatever the winner wants . . . for life.

But the price is to take whatever you choose to carry with you and wear on your feet, and then accepting only water and food from the soldiers guarding the foot race, with rifles at the ready.

You have to stay above four miles per hour for the entire time, usually days.

You can change your family’s lives forever by winning it all or by being one of the 99 who run out of warnings, slip below the speed, and get shot by a military rifle.

Young men face life, death, and dig deep into themselves to find the mental toughness many long-distance runners require to accomplish their goals, though the stakes are far far less.

For the main character Raymond Davis Garraty, seeing those he loves waiting for him far down The Walk, his mom and his girlfriend Jan, becomes the most important motivation to continue on day and night, night and day as the miles go bye taking their toll and splattering many young mens’ brains in the unending road before them.

It is the relationships these guys form during The Walk that make the story so moving.

There are some wise-cracking clowns, a mysterious loner, and new friendships made that could cause the lives of their own competition to survive, despite that making the contest that much harder for a friendly Walker to outlive everyone else.

At one point, as a storm nears, Garraty looks on dismayed as a loud mouth, named Barkovitch, taunts another Walker in an attempt to get him to throw a punch and break the rules.

Breaking rules have dark black and white consequences from the “emotionless” soldiers watching incessantly.

Inner strife amongst the young men spurns some, as others form teams, some form shaky alliances, and some swear oaths to one another.

As unlikely events follow seemingly every possible behavior and action, positive and negative, you could imagine during such a trial, The Walk almost seems a test for what an enduring human can be.

Meanwhile, the weather, from heat to rain that threatens to wash out bridges, to lightning and hail storms all play as battle after battle, skirmish after skirmish in the constant war that is the Walk.

There has never been such a gripping tale of camaraderie and humanity like this set amidst a society-induced hell on the road, complete with its own military overseers and Lord Of The Flies-like scenarios.

The only complaint or critique of The Long Walk that I have is that there could have been many more of these tales from previous or future Walk events.

***

Looking at these books, though they are not small press issue, they are certainly rare collectible books worth examining. Though publication numbers of the two first editions of The Long Walk are unknown, TheDarkTower.org believes the print run to be close to the 75,000 first editions of Rage; the rarity in them is that paperbacks are fragile and not many Very Good and Fine copies survive.

This copy of the UK The Long Walk is a personal favorite of mine.

Suntup Editions, Gerry Grace, The Long Walk, NEL, Signet, Richard Bachman, Stephen King

I prefer the cover art by Gerry Grace in the NEL copy and this book is Very Fine with square corners and white pages – almost As New, except for a slight wrinkle and a tiny white chip near the spine on the front of the cover.

Finding clean, bright covers is difficult in and of itself, but finding spines that are not cracked with one of no lines and pages not yellowed is not easy, and, at times, expensive.

Both the Signet and NEL first editions are starkly ominous and quite spectacular books visually.

The cover art on the American version of The Long Walk (not sure of the artist) highlights the menacing military man overlooking the contestants, as one is about to die.

The Red cover and black, bold font of the title, make it stand out in a “RED ALERT” type of way.

Suntup Editions, Gerry Grace, The Long Walk, NEL, Signet, Richard Bachman, Stephen King

But the NEL UK first edition of The Long Walk is truly a work of beauty.

The cover art by Gerry Grace covers the entire cover, not just a panel, and shows the Walk in full progress, complete with another menacing military man, but this one bearing the rifle that has spilled the blood of one fallen in the road.

The other Walkers amble on, like zombies, exhausted.

One is stumbling, and all are under the armored tank and possible media tank following behind them and shining spotlights to capture the ‘entertainment’ of the Walk at night.

The Beams of light seem to emanate a prison tower, or the Panopticon. And all things serve the Beam.

Suntup Editions, Gerry Grace, The Long Walk, NEL, Signet, Richard Bachman, Stephen King

The Grace UK cover is a fantastic work of art, the title emblazoned in deep crimson, and is even highlighted by a limited Suntup Editions fine art print too (sans red title).

The Forgotten Fiction Grade: YEA (read it and buy ’em if you collect)!


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Rune Works Rare Book Case, Custom Book Case, custom slipcase, hand-made, Dolso, stephen king, suntup, clamshell book case, archival safe

“The Long Walk By Richard Bachman (Stephen King) Book Review” was written by R.J. Huneke

.Rune Works Rare Book Case, Custom Book Case, custom slipcase, hand-made, Dolso, stephen king, suntup, clamshell book case, archival safe

P.S. If You Like The Hand-made Wooden Case For The Long Walk

Check Out The Rune Works Rare Book Case Page here.

Though designs can be made for others, with a Roman Numeral limited edition of 19 maximum, each one is a unique and truly one-of-a-kind collectible due to the customization of the wood used and the design nuances brought in as each one is hand-crafted.

These wooden cases are archival safe, using methods studied from the Library of Congress and other sources to provide the most protection for the book in each aspect of the Rune Works cases from the use of low acidity woods, like the poplar shown above, to the use of specific clear-coating with protective epoxy to eliminate book aging and paper degradation via off-gassing found in traditional wood stain polyurethane clear coats, to the acid-free padding, satin, rust-resistant hardware, and then the use of UV protective Plexiglass on the front of the case to display the book and its cover art in a setting that is nearly as creative and artistic as the book design itself.

Rune Works Rare Book Case, Custom Book Case, custom slipcase, hand-made, Dolso, stephen king, suntup, clamshell book case, archival safe

Wooden book cases, for example, are not used in most libraries and The Library of Congress and the Vatican’s archival safe library, because of the breakdown of the wood with off-gassing damaging and aging the paper and other book materials over time – the closest we can get to a powder-coated steel book case is a sealed and

Detailed engravings and personalizations can be added to the side, or spine, of the Rune Works Case too – just as Mr. Bachman’s signature (may he rest in peace) was added to the front of the case above – to save shelf space if one wants to put it in between other books the narrow way, versus book cover side out.

P.P.S. If You Want To Know A Little More About How The Forgotten Fiction Is Different & Our Mission . . .

We are really trying to achieve two main goals here:

  1. To bolster every author who puts out a work of fiction long after the initial buzz that accompanied its release. This is something that is usually left to an expensive public relations manager or company and even with all of their powers of marketing / PR are limited in where they can place the book months after its launch. This includes limited edition and small press publications, like Suntup Editions, that are also reviewed for their physical beauty, as well as the work’s literary art and often illustrations, so long as the initial work has been out 60 days.
  2. We love books of fiction! And as readers we have too little time to read ALL of the books that fall onto our tentative To-Read List. The Forgotten Fiction hopes that with our Yea or Nay stamp, we can definitively give our unbiased opinion to you as a recommendation that may or may not move a book from the stack to your Must-Read List.

To Read More Details On Our Process Go To The About Page Here.

I, ROBOT By Isaac Asimov: Book Review Of Science Fiction Classic

I, ROBOT By Isaac Asimov: Book Review Of Science Fiction Classic

I, ROBOT by Isaac Asimov: book review of science fiction classic highlights the prose, storytelling, and stark differences in views regarding this premiere work about robots and AI, aka artificial intelligence.

In Asimov’s I, Robot, Dr. Susan Calvin (robo-pyschologist for U.S. Robots and Mechanical Men Inc.) describes the development of robots, through nine short stories, to a reporter in the 21st century.

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The Following book review of I, Robot by Isaac Asimov is a Spoiler-ful WARNING Level YELLOW: it contains mild spoilers for the novel, but not detailed plot.

When read from beginning to end I, Robot can be seen as an evolution of Asimov’s Robots. Each story shares an interaction between humans and robots and often hints upon the unease of a growing artificial intelligence.

Here is the story synopsis, and the review continues below it.


From penguinrandomhouse.com:

Paperback
Released April 29, 2008 | ISBN 9780553382563

Each story in the book shares an interaction between humans and robots and often hints upon the unease of a growing artificial intelligence.

Asimov’s future (actually our past as his first short story is set in 2015) includes mining stations on asteroids and Mercury, spaceships with hyperdrive, and super computers along with robots taking over simple jobs like farming, while also running for office and even secretly running the world.

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Although nine stories follow Asimov Three Laws of Robotics, many stories describe robots having difficulty with these laws (either by manufacturing defect or meta-cognitive awareness) leading to their eventual interpretation of them – even a so called religion. His infamous laws governing robotic behavior have changed our perception of robots forever.

The three laws of Robotics:
1) A robot may not injure a human being or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm.
2) A robot must obey orders given to it by human beings except where such orders would conflict with the First Law.
3) A robot must protect its own existence as long as such protection does not conflict with the First or Second Law.

Despite the name Hollywood gave the film, I, Robot, starring Will Smith, the book is far from the film in terms of actual story elements, though the film is fun and captures some of the spirit, as well as a couple specific uses of the book.

Spoiler Alert: If you were a fan of the 2004 science fiction action film I, Robot directed by Alex Proyas do not expect many similarities with Isaac Asimov’s 1940-1950 short story collection of the same name. The 2004 film is much more closely based on Jeff Vintar’s original screenplay Hardwired. That film adopts Asimov’s creation of “the three laws of robotics,” shares two similar characters, and borrows one scene from his works.

Overall I, Robot is a thought provoking read, blended well with science-fact and science fiction.

If you have not read the novel, expect a vastly different story than the film with the exception of the chapter titled “Little Lost Rabbit.”

The Forgotten Fiction Grade: YEA (read it!)


About The Author From Goodreads.com:

Isaac Asimov was a Russian-born, American author, a professor of biochemistry, and a highly successful writer, best known for his works of science fiction and for his popular science books.

Professor Asimov is generally considered one of the most prolific writers of all time, having written or edited more than 500 books and an estimated 90,000 letters and postcards. He has works published in nine of the ten major categories of the Dewey Decimal System (lacking only an entry in the 100s category of Philosophy).

Asimov is widely considered a master of the science-fiction genre and, along with Robert A. Heinlein and Arthur C. Clarke, was considered one of the “Big Three” science-fiction writers during his lifetime.

[https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/16667.Isaac_Asimov]


P.S. If You Want To Know A Little More About How The Forgotten Fiction Is Different & Our Mission . . .

We are really trying to achieve two main goals here:

  1. To bolster every author who puts out a work of fiction long after the initial buzz that accompanied its release. This is something that is usually left to an expensive public relations manager or company and even with all of their powers of marketing / PR are limited in where they can place the book months after its launch. This includes limited edition and small press publications, like Suntup Editions, that are also reviewed for their physical beauty, as well as the work’s literary art and often illustrations, so long as the initial work has been out 60 days.
  2. We love books of fiction! And as readers we have too little time to read ALL of the books that fall onto our tentative To-Read List. The Forgotten Fiction hopes that with our Yea or Nay stamp, we can definitively give our unbiased opinion to you as a recommendation that may or may not move a book from the stack to your Must-Read List.

To Read More Details On Our Process Go To The About Page Here.

Want To Buy The Book from a local bookseller? Click Away!

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“I, ROBOT By Isaac Asimov: Book Review Of Science Fiction Classic” was written by Peter Maisano.