David Mack’s Star Trek: Picard – Firewall 5-Star Book Review

David Mack’s Star Trek: Picard – Firewall 5-Star Book Review

David Mack’s Star Trek: Picard – Firewall 5-Star Book Review gives a Spoiler-Free account of the new prequel in the Star Trek: Picard Series, and TFF is also simultaneously publishing an Author Interview here for the first time, as David Mack was kind enough to take the time to speak with R.J. Huneke about this brilliant novel.

At the heart of this gripping science-fiction story is identity.

What does it mean to be human? What does it mean to face rejection and prejudice because of one’s appearance?

How do we come to grips with the evolution of our personality, our self-understanding, and our self-reflection as the years roll on into adulthood?

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Not only is Star Trek: PicardFirewall a great Star Trek story, but it is a phenomenal work of fiction, in general – this is a classic.

Anyone can enjoy the venture into the thrilling world of Seven of Nine…even if you have never watched or read Star Trek.

I love the accessibility of David Mack’s Firewall, and though I am admittedly a big Star Trek fan, it is quickly apparent when reading this that anyone can enjoy the venture into the thrilling world of Seven of Nine at this tumultuous time in the character’s life, even if you have never watched or read any Star Trek.

Star Trek: Picard – Firewall is a powerful and moving queernormative coming-of-age story about Seven of Nine in the years leading up to her role in Picard (the mini-series).

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For Seven of Nine is not just searching to find her way as an independent adult, and a human, when she had her formative years taken away – along with many of her memories – by the alien cybernetic organisms known as the Borg, but she is also struggling to learn her identity as a bi-sexual woman and as a person who is prejudiced against for her appearance, in her visible remains of the Borg implants.

If you are not familiar with the TV series Star Trek: Voyager or Star Trek: Picard, Firewall brings the reader into the life of a character who was commandeered by a cyborg alien force as a child and who lost many of those years and even into early adulthood, because her mind was a part of a hive mind Collective.

Seven of Nine has had nearly all of her robotic elements – her implants – removed, but some on her face remain.

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And so many people dehumanize her, so much so that her application to join Starfleet is rejected.

Up to that point, her human identity was that of a Starfleet officer.

When this is denied, she seeks to escape earth and find a way to feel like an included member of human society, and a new way of life that suits the personality that is still forming within her.

The writing in this book is enthralling, from the world-building to the character development, and the memorable prose.

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To be human means to struggle to find a path in life, and so meanings found in Firewall’s coming-of-age storyline are very visceral and accessible.

You feel for these characters, especially Seven of Nine.

Firewall is a deeply personal and impactful book full of piercing themes.

Seven of Nine deals with PTSD, brutal anxiety and depression, and even feelings of neurodivergence.

There are keen metaphors in Firewall for the struggles of LGBTQ+ folks, especially for trans youth and trans people youth seeking identity.

Seven of Nine is an extraordinary person who deals with love and hate and creature comforts in equal measure, while striving to retain that sense of being a good person in familiar ways that we can all recognize within ourselves.

The Bookshop.org description of Star Trek: Picard – Firewall:

A thrilling prequel adventure based on the acclaimed TV series Star Trek: Picard! Two years after the USS Voyager’s return from the Delta Quadrant, Seven of Nine finds herself rejected for a position in Starfleet…and instead finds a new home with the interstellar rogue law enforcement corps known as the Fenris Rangers. The Rangers seem like an ideal fit for Seven–but to embrace this new destiny, she must leave behind all she’s ever known, and risk losing the most important thing in her life: her friendship with Admiral Kathryn Janeway. [bookshop.org]

Firewall debuted on February 27, 2024, so get your copies, Fictioneers!

The Forgotten Fiction Grade: YEA (read it!) I gave it 5/5 Stars!


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“David Mack’s Star Trek: Picard – Firewall 5-Star Book Review” Was Written By R.J. Huneke.

 

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THE FRAMED WOMEN OF ARDEMORE HOUSE by Brandy Schillace

THE FRAMED WOMEN OF ARDEMORE HOUSE by Brandy Schillace

THE FRAMED WOMEN OF ARDEMORE HOUSE by Brandy Schillace is all aces in TFF’s book, and this preview review aims to uncover some of what makes this engaging mystery so damn good, without lifting the veil too much.

This story is one of the more perplexing murder mysteries you may come across, combining new, thrilling elements with style!

Agatha Christie would love Schillace’s THE FRAMED WOMEN OF ARDEMORE HOUSE.

Not only are the brilliant and extremely engaging facets to this case enveloping, but solving a murder by antique pistol, as well as the mysterious disappearance of a rare Ardemore family portrait that may be connected, prove to be difficult entanglements that unwind in wholly unexpected ways and leaves the reader feverishly turning pages to follow the threads.

The following Preview Book Review of THE FRAMED WOMEN OF ARDEMORE HOUSE by Brandy Schillace is SPOILER-FREE.

Schillace’s characters, from the outsider-protagonist Jo Jones, to the Detective Inspector MacAdams with his inferiority complex due to his divorce, to Gwilym the young antique and hobby collector, and to the brazen Irish innkeeper and fellow outsider, Tula, they all stand up with great intrigue and pack a punch.

To ramble a little, characters are the lifeblood of fiction, with few memorable exceptions.

The one I come back to frequently is the Foundation Trilogy by Isaac Asimov, because it simultaneously thwarts the rules by creating a compelling and innovative pillar of science-fiction without (I argue, though some disagree) characters being central to the story told over the course of centuries.

I appreciate Foundation for that, but my favorite work of Asimov is and will always be THE END OF ETERNITY.

Aside from being used for near every time travel tale post-H.G. Wells, THE END OF ETERNITY has memorable and incredibly realistic characters that you root for.

They make you love the story.

Just as each character in THE FRAMED WOMEN OF ARDEMORE HOUSE stands out in their own ways and brings you on a wholly uncharted journey to a murder / painting mystery, this too is a story to love.

The young American woman, Jo, inherits an old estate with a decrepit English manor house that holds her in uncomfortable territory.

She finds hidden in a locked room what appears to be an Ardemore family portrait of an unknown relative that was taken from the library for some reason.

Shortly thereafter, it is stolen.

And then a body turns up.

The neurodivergent Jo felt like an outsider before she becomes a suspect in the murder, and that feeling only grows as she attempts to solve the crimes and find out who was the Ardemore mystery woman.

The witty, charming, and intelligent character of Jo is thirsty for answers.

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And despite her difficulty overcoming a not-too-distant divorce with a husband that continually reminded her of her autism and her behavioral faux pas – some of which she deems may be fair and some of which are certainly not – she collects herself time and again and proves to be insightful, well-read, and courageous as she presses on.

The insight into the way this character thinks is exciting, and makes me feel like I am privy to a behind the scenes look into the methods of Hercule Poirot and Sherlock Holmes that is essential to their effectiveness in solving a crime.

Schillace’s Jo Jones is flawed and extremely realistic.

The ways in which Jo reflects on how she thinks – especially using memories of her experiences to guide her – makes for a refreshing new perspective into someone who is on the spectrum and not just surviving society, but thriving despite it.

In a touching moment, the Irish innkeeper speaks of leaving her home and landing in England as an outsider, like Jo, and then the younger woman reveals a fun and difficult attribute:

“Words have just always been my people…and I don’t forget them after I read them.

“Ever? Like a photographic memory?” Tula asked. Jo scrunched up her nose. She’d never liked the term.

“It doesn’t work like that. I can recite from most of the books I’ve read–but it has to be triggered…sometimes the connections I see aren’t really there…but sometimes it means I see connections other people can’t see.”

The marked self-reflection makes the reader empathize with Jo in a deeply impactful way.

Despite the social difficulties of inter-personal relationships and reactions to situations, social norms, and speech that are often a struggle for Jo Jones, she proves to be an exceptional force in the book and a very relatable person of interest.

 

THE FRAMED WOMEN OF ARDEMORE HOUSE by Brandy Schillace is out tomorrow – February 13, 2024 – so get your copy post-haste!

 

The Forgotten Fiction Grade: YEA (read it!)


Want To Buy A Book & Support A Local Bookseller? Click Here!

 

“THE FRAMED WOMEN OF ARDEMORE HOUSE by Brandy Schillace” Book Review Was Written By R.J. Huneke.

 

THE FRAMED WOMEN OF ARDEMORE HOUSE, brandy schillace, neurodivergent, autistic, autism, mystery, murder mystery