H.G. Wells’ The Island of Doctor Moreau’s 125th By Suntup

H.G. Wells’ The Island of Doctor Moreau’s 125th By Suntup

H.G. Wells’ The Island of Doctor Moreau’s 125th By Suntup Editions is celebrating the shocking and classic work of early horror and science-fiction in deservedly grandiose fashion 125 years after its initial release.

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To say the art, designs, bonus content give this novel the proper anniversary treatment is a big understatement.

The following Preview Review of H.G. Wells’ The Island of Doctor Moreau’s By Suntup Editions will have mild plot/events *Spoilers* in the story review and then get into a perusal of the fine press editions themselves, which will be examined more thoroughly after the books arrive.

The lone survivor of a deadly shipwreck that claimed two ships, Edward Prendick washes ashore on the elusive Noble’s Isle claimed by the infamous Dr. Moreau.

The novel brings in mystery, adventure and exploration themes, as well as good old-fashioned shock-horror and sci-fi.

The science and exploration of the 19th Century, and the preceding years, birthed interesting thoughts on the wings of Darwin and Mary Shelley’s publications: that of man playing god by merging animal and man into living chimera.

H.G. Wells’ The Island of Doctor Moreau is disturbing, suspenseful and has many unexpected twists along the island’s paths.

H.G. Wells took a character in Edward that is grateful for being nursed to health and through his uniquely thankful perspective examines the mysterious noises and shadowy visages that send shivers down his spine and lead him to delve deeper into the mysteries Dr. Moreau seems to have hidden on his island.

For those that enjoy stories of the monster within, the monster that we as humans carry and sometimes unleash, and the monsters out in the world, The Island Of Dr. Moreau is a stark reminder that repulsion can shift its allegiances, despite appearances.

Science fiction writers have used human-animal chimera experiments as the inspiration for creating characters that challenge us to consider what is quintessentially human and what is animal. Since Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein (1818) created a manufactured man from parts of dead animals and humans combined.

[“Boundary Transgressions: the Human-Animal Chimera in Science Fiction” by Evelyn Tsitas]

Suntup Editions, H.G. Wells, The island Of Dr. Moreau, Suntup Editions, fine press, horror, scifi

To have the ethics of bioengineering examined in such an evocative manner by Wells in 1896 is incredible.

And Suntup Editions have outdone themselves again with their treatment of H.G. Wells’ The Island of Doctor Moreau made into three limited edition states.

  • Suntup’s Artist Edition is limited to 1000 copies and is the only state with a dust jacket illustrated by Benz and Chang. The book is a full cloth, smyth sewn binding, is printed offset, has two-hits of foil stamping, and is signed by the artist.
  • The Numbered Edition of 350 copies is a quarter cloth binding with Japanese cloth boards, a cover foil stamped in gold and endsheets are custom designed for this state. It is printed letterpress on Mohawk Via and is signed by Megan Shepherd, Adam Roberts & Benz and Chang.
  • The Lettered edition is 26 copies with a full goatskin binding and a letterpress-printed spine label. The cover features a letterpress printed, die cut map of Noble’s Isle that looks amazing and the endsheets are hand marbled, while the pages are printed letterpress on Mohawk Via, and it comes in a clamshell enclosure covered in Japanese cloth with marbled paper floors. It is also signed by Megan Shepherd, Adam Roberts & Benz and Chang.

The books all look fantastic with six stand-out full color illustrations by Benz and Chang!

Suntup Editions, H.G. Wells, The island Of Dr. Moreau, Suntup Editions, fine press, horror, scifi

But as is befitting such an entertaining and historic work of fiction, Suntup has also included a bevy of bonus material, including a new exclusive foreword by Megan Shepherd and an afterword by Adam Roberts, who sign both the numbered and lettered states, and three Appendixes:

Bonus Content

Included in all editions is the following bonus content:

Appendix A: Wells Explains: Two Essays Relating to Moreau’s Argument.
H.G. Wells, The Province of Pain (1894)
H.G. Wells, The Limits of Individual Plasticity (1895)

Appendix B: ‘The Terrible Medusa Case’: An Historical Source for Prendick’s Shipwreck.
A narrative account of the infamous shipwreck Méduse (1818).
Reproduction of Théodore Géricault’s masterpiece painting The Raft of the Medusa (c.1819).

Appendix C: Wells’s First Draft of Moreau.
A study and excerpt from H.G. Wells’s original draft of Moreau.

[Suntup.press]

We will thoroughly review the physical books themselves, the numbered and artist editions, after they arrive.

But seeing such trippy and befitting art, along with two letterpress editions, designed with bite for our inner explorer, the wait to see these in person is a difficult one.

Suntup Editions, H.G. Wells, The island Of Dr. Moreau, Suntup Editions, fine press, horror, scifi

Letterpress will make reading and rereading the numbered edition a sensational experience.

I do have one critique: I would have loved the numbered edition to match the previous Wells installments in the book’s outer design – but I understand and am very happy with the incredible design of the editions that have been created here (I love the images on the covers and I love Japanese cloth) and since this brought in Artist Editions and a wild lettered edition (what a MAP!) I feel my OCD inner-Sheldon Cooper can be quieted and content – but I still cannot wait to put this on the shelf!

Suntup Editions, H.G. Wells, The island Of Dr. Moreau, Suntup Editions, fine press, horror, scifi

In between my H.G. Wells trilogy and Robert Heinlein set on my shelf in the “Pillars of Sci-fi Suntup Section” The Island Of Dr. Moreau will go and continue to be an inspiration.

The Artist Edition of The Island Of Dr. Moreau is still available at Suntup’s site here!

 

The Forgotten Fiction Grade: YEA (read it! buy it!)


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“H.G. Wells’ The Island of Doctor Moreau’s 125th By Suntup” was written by R.J. Huneke; Illustrations © 2021 by Benz and Chang and the Backdrop photography by Yegor Malinovskii for Suntup Editions.

 

After Origin By Dan Brown I Can’t Wait For Robert Langdon #6

After Origin By Dan Brown I Can’t Wait For Robert Langdon #6

After Origin By Dan Brown I Can’t Wait For Robert Langdon #6, because unlike every other installment in the Langdon series, Origin did not sit well.

The payoff was not enough this time.

The character that became a modern-day Sherlock Holmes in Angels and Demons, Robert Langdon, is the linchpin of Dan Brown’s series that surround the professor with symbols, mysteries, murders, and two thrills, of the hunt or quest and the mortal danger held therein, and of the epic knowledge that comes out when the many secrets are revealed at the stories’ end.

I love the works of Dan Brown.

Rarely has education through entertainment been as intriguing, as puzzling, as revelatory as when The Holy Grail is besieged in The Da Vinci Code, or when myriad lives come so close to extinction in Inferno (Dante would have loved it).

And the character of Langdon drives the story in every book in the series, just as Holmes and Watson do in many of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s tales.

But that comparison reveals the biggest issue I had with Origin: the supporting cast were not even close to on par with Langdon or his previous comrades and nemeses.

Please comment and change my mind here; I love Dan Brown’s work and want to change my mind.

Langdon’s royalty alienating female sidekick takes a backseat early on in the story to an AI.

Let me repeat that for emphasis: an artificial intelligence created by a forty-year-old genius (Musk, meets Jobs, meets Gates, meets Einstein?) who is intriguing but . . .

MAJOR **SPOILER ALERT** to opening chapters to follow.

Origin, Dan Brown, Robert Langdon, book review, tff, da vinci code

. . . the character I was most invested in is killed to open the thriller. And an AI steps in to take his place and to largely supplant the female protagonist and the (at that point) clueless professor.

And yes, the book is thrilling, the suspense, the arc of grandiose mystery and conspiracy, they are all there.

The Fibonacci Sequence is also INCREDIBLY interesting!

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So, you had me from the cover – I LOVE IT – and then you lost me while Langdon and his dame run from the murder scene for their lives guided by IBM’s Watson.

Maybe it is the decade or more of research into AI and being surrounded by quite a few people at times that are far more knowledgeable of the subject than I, some of them write semi-autonomous code to get robots to behave certain ways, that spoiled this novel for me.

Maybe it was having reread the classic Neuromancer by William Gibson shortly before I picked up Origin that put such a bad taste in my mouth, because the godfather of cyberpunk’s AI in the 1980’s was a lot more convincing and all-around interesting than Brown’s.

AI is mind blowing, in and of itself, and world changing, and it just felt all too happy to me as that luke-warm character became the fulcrum, even over Langdon, for periods of time.

Robert Langdon’s character should not take a backseat to anyone except his Moriarty or his Irene Adler, because Sherlock would be drawn and quartered before he let Lestrade become the focal point of the game.

The writing was as good or better than it has ever been for Brown.

And he has a tall task every time he continues the series: to match or outdo his previous Langdon stories.

But Dan Brown has pulled off the nearly impossible feat four times before! From Angels and Demons and on he did it . . . until now.

I expect a grandiose differentiating installment when or if Robert Langdon graces us in a sixth novel.

 

The Forgotten Fiction Grade: NAY (NAY! Skip it)


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“After Origin By Dan Brown I Can’t Wait For Robert Langdon #6” was written by R.J. Huneke

 

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Dark Across The Bay By Ania Ahlborn Coming From Earthling

Dark Across The Bay By Ania Ahlborn Coming From Earthling

Dark Across The Bay By Ania Ahlborn Coming From Earthling Publications in a S/L edition befitting the thrilling new novel.

The Following TFF Preview Review Will Only Contain **Mild Spoilers** To The Initial Plot Of The Book’s Opening.

Dark Across The Bay, Ania Ahlborn, Earthling publications, fine press, horror, suspense

Best-selling author Ania Ahlborn takes a fractured family to a secluded vacation home where unnerving and horrific hauntings rattle the reader and the Parrishs alike, and then the stalking begins to slowly unravel everyone’s nerves.

Dark Across The Bay bleeds mysterious hints at insidiousness growing rampant, from the creepy island rental besieging the vulnerable family to the stalkers intruding on them.

Before a marriage can formally dissolve, or Lark and Leo can attempt to move on, everyone is brought to the beach house Airbnb off the coast of Raven’s Head, Maine, 1000 miles from their family home, for a weekend retreat.

The island has only the one house and only one way on or off its shores: by boat.

The expansive residence contains wonderful window views out onto foggy waters, but it seems to be off somehow.

It makes for a great setting, as everything from the building itself to its innards seem creepily askew.

It holds myriad secrets that are tucked away, like the odd nooks and hallways full of unsettling amounts of fishing paraphernalia and hidden corner cubbies full of shabby books.

And ‘Mom’ wants ‘family time’ to be devoid of cell phones in the house, and so the modern interconnectivity of the world and its people easily communicating is stoppered bringing further isolation at times. When the phones come to back to life it is alarming.

The characters are each well met in the story, and the relatable, familiar family interactions spark lots of memories of growing up.

You may not like each member of the Parrishs, but they are certainly all intriguing, from the nearly divorced parents almost certain of their fate, to their two children, who are young adults struggling through recent trauma.

Lark is a novice novelist, battling through a bad break-up, and her brother, Leo, is distanced from her (and everyone), as he aims to leave the grief of his best friend’s death behind with an escape to the shores of Thailand.

Ania Ahlborn brilliantly keeps the characters off balance, as well as the reader.

The seemingly discernable arcs of each of the characters become further and further confused as their sense of calm and, at times, outright sense of terror is ratcheted up in stark, unexpected ways.

Who would torment the family of four? Is it personal, and if so, why travel 1000 miles to dole out such cruel punishment? Are there any supernatural elements at play?

The prose is wonderfully written, painting clear, boisterous scenes with visceral jolts to the heart.

Suspense and old fashioned, yet modernized, and innovative mystery meets elements of horror in this fantastic phantasm of a tale.

Dark Across The Bay by Ania Ahlborn is an amazing work from one of speculative fiction’s brightest minds.

Dark Across The Bay, Ania Ahlborn, Earthling publications, fine press, horror, suspense

Her use of world building and literary prowess makes for one hell of a story, and Dark Across The Bay debuts on a fine press publisher with Signed and Limited editions from Earthling Publications.

There are 500 numbered, Smyth sewn, offset printed copies, signed by Ania Ahlborn and Josh Malerman, as well as 15 lettered, offset printed, tray-cased hardcovers, with both the book and the tray-case being hand-made using the finest materials, and signed by all contributors.

The gorgeous cover art and interior art is brought to us by renowned illustrator Vincent Chong, and the book contains an introduction from the author as well as best seller Josh Malerman (author of Bird Box and Goblin).

They still have copies available! Take a look here!

If you are not familiar with Earthling, they have made some of the finest hand-crafted editions of books, each with their own unique feel.

An all-time grail for this reviewer is Earthling’s lettered edition of The Hellbound Heart: 20th Anniversary Edition (2007) novella by Clive Barker, and I cannot wait to see what they have in store for the design of Dark Across The Bay by Ania Ahlborn.

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We already know the cover art from Vincent Chong is outstanding.

We will conduct a more in-depth review after the book is released, going further into the novel and into the book edition.

But for now this has to be one of the most eagerly awaited suspense and horror books coming this year, and our rating is:

The Forgotten Fiction Grade: YEA (read it! buy it here)


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“Dark Across The Bay By Ania Ahlborn Coming From Earthling” was written by R.J. Huneke